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Effectiveness of dual-task functional power training for preventing falls in older people: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

Daly, Robin M., Duckham, Rachel L., Tait, Jamie L., Rantalainen, Timo, Nowson, Caryl A., Taaffe, Dennis R., Sanders, Kerrie, Hill, Keith D., Kidgell, Dawson J. and Busija, Lucy 2015, Effectiveness of dual-task functional power training for preventing falls in older people: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial, Trials, vol. 16, Article Number : 120, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1186/s13063-015-0652-y.

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Title Effectiveness of dual-task functional power training for preventing falls in older people: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Daly, Robin M.ORCID iD for Daly, Robin M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9897-1598
Duckham, Rachel L.ORCID iD for Duckham, Rachel L. orcid.org/0000-0001-7882-2950
Tait, Jamie L.
Rantalainen, TimoORCID iD for Rantalainen, Timo orcid.org/0000-0001-6977-4782
Nowson, Caryl A.ORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl A. orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Taaffe, Dennis R.
Sanders, Kerrie
Hill, Keith D.
Kidgell, Dawson J.
Busija, Lucy
Journal name Trials
Volume number 16
Season Article Number : 120
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1745-6215
Keyword(s) Cluster randomised controlled trial
Dual-task training
Falls
Muscle function
Muscle power
Older persons
Study protocol
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, Research & Experimental
Research & Experimental Medicine
COGSTATE BRIEF BATTERY
AGE-RELATED-CHANGES
LEG POWER
PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE
PEAK POWER
COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
STEPPING EXERCISE
IMPROVES BALANCE
ELDERLY-PEOPLE
Summary BACKGROUND: Falls are a major public health concern with at least one third of people aged 65 years and over falling at least once per year, and half of these will fall repeatedly, which can lead to injury, pain, loss of function and independence, reduced quality of life and even death. Although the causes of falls are varied and complex, the age-related loss in muscle power has emerged as a useful predictor of disability and falls in older people. In this population, the requirements to produce explosive and rapid movements often occurs whilst simultaneously performing other attention-demanding cognitive or motor tasks, such as walking while talking or carrying an object. The primary aim of this study is to determine whether dual-task functional power training (DT-FPT) can reduce the rate of falls in community-dwelling older people. METHODS/DESIGN: The study design is an 18-month cluster randomised controlled trial in which 280 adults aged ≥65 years residing in retirement villages, who are at increased risk of falling, will be randomly allocated to: 1) an exercise programme involving DT-FPT, or 2) a usual care control group. The intervention is divided into 3 distinct phases: 6 months of supervised DT-FPT, a 6-month 'step down' maintenance programme, and a 6-month follow-up. The primary outcome will be the number of falls after 6, 12 and 18 months. Secondary outcomes will include: lower extremity muscle power and strength, grip strength, functional assessments of gait, reaction time and dynamic balance under single- and dual-task conditions, activities of daily living, quality of life, cognitive function and falls-related self-efficacy. We will also evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the programme for preventing falls. DISCUSSION: The study offers a novel approach that may guide the development and implementation of future community-based falls prevention programmes that specifically focus on optimising muscle power and dual-task performance to reduce falls risk under 'real life' conditions in older adults. In addition, the 'step down' programme will provide new information about the efficacy of a less intensive maintenance programme for reducing the risk of falls over an extended period. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12613001161718 . Date registered 23 October 2013.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-0652-y
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920409 Injury Control
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074953

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.