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Fall and fracture risk in sarcopenia and dynapenia with and without obesity: the role of lifestyle interventions

Scott, David, Daly, Robin M., Sanders, Kerrie M. and Ebeling, Peter R. 2015, Fall and fracture risk in sarcopenia and dynapenia with and without obesity: the role of lifestyle interventions, Current osteoporosis reports, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 235-244, doi: 10.1007/s11914-015-0274-z.

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Title Fall and fracture risk in sarcopenia and dynapenia with and without obesity: the role of lifestyle interventions
Author(s) Scott, David
Daly, Robin M.ORCID iD for Daly, Robin M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9897-1598
Sanders, Kerrie M.
Ebeling, Peter R.
Journal name Current osteoporosis reports
Volume number 13
Issue number 4
Start page 235
End page 244
Total pages 10
Publisher Current Medicine Group
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2015-08
ISSN 1544-2241
Keyword(s) Dynapenia
Falls
Fractures
Lifestyle
Obesity
Sarcopenia
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Endocrinology & Metabolism
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
VITAMIN-D SUPPLEMENTATION
MUSCLE PROTEIN-SYNTHESIS
BODY-MASS INDEX
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
FAT-FREE MASS
OLDER-ADULTS
WEIGHT-LOSS
POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN
SKELETAL-MUSCLE
Summary Due to their differing etiologies and consequences, it has been proposed that the term "sarcopenia" should revert to its original definition of age-related muscle mass declines, with a separate term, "dynapenia", describing muscle strength and function declines. There is increasing interest in the interactions of sarcopenia and dynapenia with obesity. Despite an apparent protective effect of obesity on fracture, increased adiposity may compromise bone health, and the presence of sarcopenia and/or dynapenia ("sarcopenic obesity" and "dynapenic obesity") may exacerbate the risk of falls and fracture in obese older adults. Weight loss interventions are likely to be beneficial for older adults with sarcopenic and dynapenic obesity but may result in further reductions in muscle and bone health. The addition of exercise including progressive resistance training and nutritional strategies, including protein and vitamin D supplementation, may optimise body composition and muscle function outcomes thereby reducing falls and fracture risk in this population.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11914-015-0274-z
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920116 Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Current Medicine Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30074954

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Created: Tue, 11 Aug 2015, 14:50:05 EST

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