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Correctional psychology and the desistance paradigm: commentary for the special issue of Criminal justice and behavior

Day, Andrew 2015, Correctional psychology and the desistance paradigm: commentary for the special issue of Criminal justice and behavior, Criminal justice and behavior, vol. 42, no. 1, Special issue: Response, rehabilitation, and reconciliation: the normative dimensions of the offender's desistance journey, pp. 121-124, doi: 10.1177/0093854814550032.

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Title Correctional psychology and the desistance paradigm: commentary for the special issue of Criminal justice and behavior
Formatted title Correctional psychology and the desistance paradigm: commentary for the special issue of Criminal justice and behavior
Author(s) Day, Andrew
Journal name Criminal justice and behavior
Volume number 42
Issue number 1
Season Special issue: Response, rehabilitation, and reconciliation: the normative dimensions of the offender's desistance journey
Start page 121
End page 124
Total pages 4
Publisher SAGE Publications
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, Calif.
Publication date 2015-01
ISSN 0093-8548
1552-3594
Summary Let me begin this commentary by suggesting that many of the ideas contained in this special issue will be important to the future of correctional psychology. Although each of the authors offer different perspectives on the role that the criminal justice system has to play in the process of desistance from crime, they all identify the importance of a valueoriented analysis to effective offender rehabilitation. Their focus is on promoting desistance at all points of the justice process; from how the legal system can promote therapeutic outcomes through to the provision of post-release support services and the need for community engagement. By approaching the tasks of both rehabilitation and reintegration from a values perspective, they have been able to identify a range of novel and innovative approaches that have the potential to make a real difference. Even more encouragingly, these draw on resources that may already be available to correctional psychologists and yet are often underutilized. In addition, the confidence, and indeed the optimism, expressed in these articles provides a refreshing counter to suggestions that contemporary correctional practice has become pre-occupied with the need to “manage” offenders and for professionals to focus on fulfilling their administrative obligations (see Hardy, 2014).
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/0093854814550032
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
160299 Criminology not elsewhere classified
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
180199 Law not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C2 Other contribution to refereed journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, International Association for Correctional and Forensic Psychology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075134

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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