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Evaluating young adult voter decision-making involvement within a compulsory political system

Winchester, Tiffany, Hall, John and Binney, Wayne 2015, Evaluating young adult voter decision-making involvement within a compulsory political system, Qualitative market research, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 252-277, doi: 10.1108/QMR-09-2013-0061.

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Title Evaluating young adult voter decision-making involvement within a compulsory political system
Author(s) Winchester, Tiffany
Hall, John
Binney, Wayne
Journal name Qualitative market research
Volume number 18
Issue number 3
Start page 252
End page 277
Total pages 26
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bradford, Eng.
Publication date 2015-06-08
ISSN 1352-2752
Keyword(s) Consumer behaviour
Decision-making
Involvement
Political marketing
Young adult voters
Summary Purpose - This study aims to specifically focus on the lower-involvement young adult voters within the Australian compulsory voting context. It explores voters’ political decision-making by considering the influence of the consumer behaviour theory of involvement. Design/methodology/approach - A thematic analysis was conducted to analyse the interviews within the two research questions: information seeking and decision-making. Findings - Key themes within information seeking are the reach of the information available, the frequency of the information presented, the creativity of the message and one-way versus two-way communication. Key themes within evaluation are promise keeping/trust, achievements or performance and policies. Lower-involvement decision-making has the potential to be a habitual, limited evaluation decision. However, issues of trust, performance and policies may encourage evaluation, thereby reducing the chances of habitually voting for the same party as before. Practical implications - This new area of research has implications for the application of marketing for organisations and political marketing theory. Considering voting decision-making as a lower-involvement decision has implications for assisting the creation and adaptation of strategies to focus on this group of the population. Originality/value - The compulsory voting environment creates a unique situation to study lower-involvement decision-making, as these young adults are less likely to opt out of the voting process. Previous research in political marketing has not specifically explored the application of involvement to young adult voting within a compulsory voting environment.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/QMR-09-2013-0061
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Emerald Group Publishing
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075338

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.