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An integrative framework for the appraisal of coloration in nature

Kemp, Darrell J., Herberstein, Marie E., Fleishman, Leo J., Endler, John A., Bennett, Andrew T. D., Dyer, Adrian G., Hart, Nathan S., Marshall, Justin and Whiting, Martin J. 2015, An integrative framework for the appraisal of coloration in nature, American naturalist, vol. 185, no. 6, pp. 705-724, doi: 10.1086/681021.

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Title An integrative framework for the appraisal of coloration in nature
Author(s) Kemp, Darrell J.
Herberstein, Marie E.
Fleishman, Leo J.
Endler, John A.ORCID iD for Endler, John A. orcid.org/0000-0002-7557-7627
Bennett, Andrew T. D.ORCID iD for Bennett, Andrew T. D. orcid.org/0000-0001-8512-2805
Dyer, Adrian G.
Hart, Nathan S.
Marshall, Justin
Whiting, Martin J.
Journal name American naturalist
Volume number 185
Issue number 6
Start page 705
End page 724
Total pages 20
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Place of publication Chicago, Ill.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1537-5323
Keyword(s) Biophysics
Color signaling
Neural processing
Optics
Perception
Sensory ecology
Vision
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
HONEYBEE APIS-MELLIFERA
CONE VISUAL PIGMENTS
OIL DROPLETS
SPECTRAL SENSITIVITIES
DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER
CHROMATICITY DIAGRAMS
POECILIA-RETICULATA
BUTTERFLY PAPILIO
SEXUAL SELECTION
MOTION DETECTION
Summary The world in color presents a dazzling dimension of phenotypic variation. Biological interest in this variation has burgeoned, due to both increased means for quantifying spectral information and heightened appreciation for how animals view the world differently than humans. Effective study of color traits is challenged by how to best quantify visual perception in nonhuman species. This requires consideration of at least visual physiology but ultimately also the neural processes underlying perception. Our knowledge of color perception is founded largely on the principles gained from human psychophysics that have proven generalizable based on comparative studies in select animal models. Appreciation of these principles, their empirical foundation, and the reasonable limits to their applicability is crucial to reaching informed conclusions in color research. In this article, we seek a common intellectual basis for the study of color in nature. We first discuss the key perceptual principles, namely, retinal photoreception, sensory channels, opponent processing, color constancy, and receptor noise. We then draw on this basis to inform an analytical framework driven by the research question in relation to identifiable viewers and visual tasks of interest. Consideration of the limits to perceptual inference guides two primary decisions: first, whether a sensory-based approach is necessary and justified and, second, whether the visual task refers to perceptual distance or discriminability. We outline informed approaches in each situation and discuss key challenges for future progress, focusing particularly on how animals perceive color. Given that animal behavior serves as both the basic unit of psychophysics and the ultimate driver of color ecology/evolution, behavioral data are critical to reconciling knowledge across the schools of color research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1086/681021
Field of Research 060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, University of Chicago Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075363

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.