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Variable environmental effects on a multicomponent sexually selected trait

Cole, Gemma L. and Endler, John A. 2015, Variable environmental effects on a multicomponent sexually selected trait, American naturalist, vol. 185, no. 4, pp. 452-468, doi: 10.1086/680022.

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Title Variable environmental effects on a multicomponent sexually selected trait
Author(s) Cole, Gemma L.ORCID iD for Cole, Gemma L. orcid.org/0000-0002-3365-3580
Endler, John A.ORCID iD for Endler, John A. orcid.org/0000-0002-7557-7627
Journal name American naturalist
Volume number 185
Issue number 4
Start page 452
End page 468
Total pages 17
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Place of publication Chicago, Ill.
Publication date 2015-04
ISSN 1537-5323
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
multivariate selection
correlational selection
evolution
environmental effects
color signal
color vision.
GUPPIES POECILIA-RETICULATA
COLOR-PATTERN VARIATION
SENSORY DRIVE
MATE-CHOICE
REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION
CAROTENOID LIMITATION
NONLINEAR SELECTION
SPECIES RECOGNITION
FEMALE PREFERENCES
Summary Multicomponent signals are made up of interacting elements that generate a functional signaling unit. The interactions between signal components and their effects on individual fitness are not well understood, and the effect of environment is even less so. It is usually assumed that color patterns appear the same in all light environments and that the effects of each color are additive. Using guppies, Poecilia reticulata, we investigated the effect of water color on the interactions between components of sexually selected male coloration. Through behavioral mate choice trials in four different water colors, we estimated the attractiveness of male color patterns, using multivariate fitness estimates and overall signal contrast. Our results show that females exhibit preferences that favor groups of colors rather than individual colors independently and that each environment favors different color combinations. We found that these effects are consistent with female guppies selecting entire color patterns on the basis of overall visual contrast. This suggests that both individuals and populations inhabiting different light environments will be subject to divergent, multivariate selection. Although the appearance of color patterns changes with light environment, achromatic components change little, suggesting that these could function in species recognition or other aspects of communication that must work across environments. Consequently, we predict different phylogenetic patterns between chromatic and achromatic signals within the same clades.
Language eng
DOI 10.1086/680022
Field of Research 060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, University of Chicago Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075364

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.