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White sharks exploit the sun during predatory approaches

Huveneers, Charlie, Holman, Dirk, Robbins, Rachel, Fox, Andrew, Endler, John A. and Taylor, Alex H. 2015, White sharks exploit the sun during predatory approaches, American naturalist, vol. 185, no. 4, pp. 562-570, doi: 10.1086/680010.

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Title White sharks exploit the sun during predatory approaches
Author(s) Huveneers, Charlie
Holman, Dirk
Robbins, Rachel
Fox, Andrew
Endler, John A.ORCID iD for Endler, John A. orcid.org/0000-0002-7557-7627
Taylor, Alex H.
Journal name American naturalist
Volume number 185
Issue number 4
Start page 562
End page 570
Total pages 9
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Place of publication Chicago, Ill.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1537-5323
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Carcharodon carcharias
behavioral flexibility
concealment
hiding strategy
predation strategy
prey detection
ARCTOCEPHALUS-PUSILLUS-PUSILLUS
CARCHARODON-CARCHARIAS
CALEDONIAN CROWS
SOUTH-AFRICA
FORAGING BEHAVIOR
PREY INTERACTIONS
LIGHT-INTENSITY
WHALE CARCASS
SEAL ISLAND
CALIFORNIA
Summary There is no conclusive evidence of any nonhuman animal using the sun as part of its predation strategy. Here, we show that the world's largest predatory fish-the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias)-exploits the sun when approaching baits by positioning the sun directly behind them. On sunny days, sharks reversed their direction of approach along an east-west axis from morning to afternoon but had uniformly distributed approach directions during overcast conditions. These results show that white sharks have sufficient behavioral flexibility to exploit fluctuating environmental features when predating. This sun-tracking predation strategy has a number of potential functional roles, including improvement of prey detection, avoidance of retinal overstimulation, and predator concealment.
Language eng
DOI 10.1086/680010
Field of Research 060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, University of Chicago Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075365

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.