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Field evaluation of melolure, a formate analogue of cuelure, and reassessment of fruit fly species trapped in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Dominiak, Bernard C., Campbell, Angus J., Jang, Eric B., Ramsey, Amanda and Fanson, Benjamin G. 2015, Field evaluation of melolure, a formate analogue of cuelure, and reassessment of fruit fly species trapped in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Journal of economic entomology, vol. 108, no. 3, pp. 1176-1181, doi: 10.1093/jee/tov048.

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Title Field evaluation of melolure, a formate analogue of cuelure, and reassessment of fruit fly species trapped in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Author(s) Dominiak, Bernard C.
Campbell, Angus J.
Jang, Eric B.
Ramsey, Amanda
Fanson, Benjamin G.
Journal name Journal of economic entomology
Volume number 108
Issue number 3
Start page 1176
End page 1181
Total pages 6
Publisher Entomological Society of America
Place of publication Annapolis, MD
Publication date 2015-06
ISSN 0022-0493
1938-291X
Keyword(s) Bactrocera
Dacus
Queensland fruit fly
cuelure
melolure
Summary In Australia, tephritids are usually attracted to either cuelure or methyl eugenol. Methyl eugenol is a very effective lure, but cuelure is less effective likely due to low volatility. A new formate analogue of cuelure, melolure, has increased volatility, resulting in improved efficacy with the melon fruit fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett. We tested the efficacy of melolure with fruit fly species in Sydney as part of the National Exotic Fruit Fly Monitoring programme. This monitoring programme has 71 trap sites across Sydney, with each trap site comprising separate Lynfield traps containing either cuelure, methyl eugenol, or capilure lure. In 2008, an additional Lynfield trap with melolure plugs was added to seven sites. In 2009 and 2010, an additional Lynfield trap with melolure wicks was added to 11 trap sites and traps were monitored fortnightly for 2 yr. Capture rates for melolure traps were similar to cuelure traps for Dacus absonifacies (May) and Dacus aequalis (Coquillet), but melolure traps consistently caught fewer Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt) than cuelure traps. However, trap sites with both a cuelure and melolure traps had increased capture rates for D. absonifacies and D. aequalis, and a marginally significant increase for B. tryoni. Melolure plugs were less effective than melolure wicks, but this effect may be related to lure concentration. The broader Bactrocera group species were attracted more to cuelure than melolure while the Dacus group species were attracted more to melolure than cuelure. There is no benefit in switching from cuelure to melolure to monitor B. tryoni, the most important fruit fly pest in Australia.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/jee/tov048
Field of Research 070308 Crop and Pasture Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
0703 Crop And Pasture Production
0501 Ecological Applications
0608 Zoology
Socio Economic Objective 970107 Expanding Knowledge in the Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Entomological Society of America
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075378

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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