Openly accessible

Understanding e-democracy: government-led initiatives for democratic reform

Freeman, Julie and Quirke, Sharna 2013, Understanding e-democracy: government-led initiatives for democratic reform, Journal of e-democracy and open government, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 141-154.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
freeman-understandingedemocracy-2013.pdf Published version application/pdf 475.17KB 562

Title Understanding e-democracy: government-led initiatives for democratic reform
Author(s) Freeman, JulieORCID iD for Freeman, Julie orcid.org/0000-0002-7599-4105
Quirke, Sharna
Journal name Journal of e-democracy and open government
Volume number 5
Issue number 2
Start page 141
End page 154
Total pages 14
Publisher Danube University Krems
Place of publication Krems, Austria
Publication date 2013
ISSN 2075-9517
Keyword(s) E-democracy
e-participation
e-government
democratic reform
local government youth engagement
Iceland constitution
information and communication technologies (ICTs)
Summary Information and communication technologies (ICTs) offer opportunities for greater civic participation in democratic reform. Government ICT use has, however, predominantly been associated with e-government applications that focus on one-way information provision and service delivery. This article distinguishes between e-government and processes of edemocracy, which facilitate active civic engagement through two-way, ongoing dialogue. It draws from participation initiatives undertaken in two case studies. The first highlights efforts to increase youth political engagement in the local government area of Milton Keynes in the United Kingdom. The second is Iceland’s constitutional crowdsourcing, an initiative intended to increase civic input into constitutional reform. These examples illustrate that, in order to maintain legitimacy in the networked environment, a change in governmental culture is required to enable open and responsive e-democracy practices. When coupled with traditional participation methods, processes of e-democracy facilitate widespread opportunities for civic involvement and indicate that digital practices should not be separated from the everyday operations of government. While online democratic engagement is a slowly evolving process, initial steps are being undertaken by governments that enable e-participation to shape democratic reform.
Notes Paper from the CeDEM13 (Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government 2013).
Language eng
Field of Research 200102 Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies
Socio Economic Objective 890403 Internet Broadcasting
HERDC Research category C3.1 Non-refereed articles in a professional journal
ERA Research output type X Not reportable
Copyright notice ©2013, Danube University Krems
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075430

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 489 Abstract Views, 563 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 17 Aug 2015, 14:12:03 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.