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Preexercise aminoacidemia and muscle protein synthesis after resistance exercise

Burke, Louise M., Hawley, John A., Ross, Megan L., Moore, Daniel R., Phillips, Stuart M., Slater, Gary R., Stellingwerff, Trent, Tipton, Kevin D., Garnham, Andrew P. and Coffey, Vernon G. 2012, Preexercise aminoacidemia and muscle protein synthesis after resistance exercise, Medicine & science in sports & exercise, vol. 44, no. 10, pp. 1968-1977, doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31825d28fa.

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Title Preexercise aminoacidemia and muscle protein synthesis after resistance exercise
Author(s) Burke, Louise M.
Hawley, John A.
Ross, Megan L.
Moore, Daniel R.
Phillips, Stuart M.
Slater, Gary R.
Stellingwerff, Trent
Tipton, Kevin D.
Garnham, Andrew P.
Coffey, Vernon G.
Journal name Medicine & science in sports & exercise
Volume number 44
Issue number 10
Start page 1968
End page 1977
Total pages 10
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2012-10
ISSN 0195-9131
1530-0315
Keyword(s) amino acid delivery
fast and slow proteins
muscle protein synthesis
leucine
Acidosis
Adult
Amino Acids
Humans
Leg
Male
Milk Proteins
Muscle Proteins
Muscle, Skeletal
Phosphorylation
Resistance Training
Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa
Serine
Sweetening Agents
Threonine
Whey Proteins
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Sport Sciences
ESSENTIAL AMINO-ACID
SKELETAL-MUSCLE
CARBOHYDRATE INGESTION
YOUNG MEN
SIGNALING RESPONSES
MAMMALIAN TARGET
DOSE-RESPONSE
STIMULATION
Summary PURPOSE: We have previously shown that the aminoacidemia caused by the consumption of a rapidly digested protein after resistance exercise enhances muscle protein synthesis (MPS) more than the amino acid (AA) profile associated with a slowly digested protein. Here, we investigated whether differential feeding patterns of a whey protein mixture commencing before exercise affect postexercise intracellular signaling and MPS.

METHODS: Twelve resistance-trained males performed leg resistance exercise 45 min after commencing each of three volume-matched nutrition protocols: placebo (PLAC, artificially sweetened water), BOLUS (25 g of whey protein + 5 g of leucine dissolved in artificially sweetened water; 1 × 500 mL), or PULSE (15 × 33-mL aliquots of BOLUS drink every 15 min).

RESULTS: The preexercise rise in plasma AA concentration with PULSE was attenuated compared with BOLUS (P < 0.05); this effect was reversed after exercise, with two-fold greater leucine concentrations in PULSE compared with BOLUS (P < 0.05). One-hour postexercise, phosphorylation of p70 S6Kthr389 and rpS6ser235/6 was increased above baseline with BOLUS and PULSE, but not PLAC (P < 0.05); furthermore, PULSE > BOLUS (P < 0.05). MPS throughout 5 h of recovery was higher with protein ingestion compared with PLAC (0.037 ± 0.007), with no differences between BOLUS or PULSE (0.085 ± 0.013 vs. 0.095 ± 0.010%.h-1, respectively, P = 0.56).

CONCLUSIONS: Manipulation of aminoacidemia before resistance exercise via different patterns of intake of protein altered plasma AA profiles and postexercise intracellular signaling. However, there was no difference in the enhancement of the muscle protein synthetic response after exercise. Protein sources producing a slow AA release, when consumed before resistance exercise in sufficient amounts, are as effective as rapidly digested proteins in promoting postexercise MPS.
Language eng
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31825d28fa
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, American College of Sports Medicine
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075456

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