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The challenges acute care nurse unit managers face and the strategies they use to address them: perceptions of directors of nursing and nurse unit managers

Gaskin, Cadeyrn J, Ockerby, Cherene M, Smith, Tammy R, Russell, Vibeke and O'Connell, Bev 2012, The challenges acute care nurse unit managers face and the strategies they use to address them: perceptions of directors of nursing and nurse unit managers, Journal of management and organization, vol. 18, no. 5, Special issue: Healthcare management: progress, problems and solutions, pp. 625-640, doi: 10.1017/S1833367200000572.

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Title The challenges acute care nurse unit managers face and the strategies they use to address them: perceptions of directors of nursing and nurse unit managers
Author(s) Gaskin, Cadeyrn J
Ockerby, Cherene M
Smith, Tammy R
Russell, Vibeke
O'Connell, Bev
Journal name Journal of management and organization
Volume number 18
Issue number 5
Season Special issue: Healthcare management: progress, problems and solutions
Start page 625
End page 640
Total pages 16
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2012-09
ISSN 1833-3672
1839-3527
Keyword(s) nurse management
nurse managers
directors of nursing
healthcare management
Social Sciences
Management
Business & Economics
Summary The aim of this study was to investigate the challenges that nurse unit managers (NUMs) face while working in acute care settings, the strategies they use to deal with these challenges, and the effectiveness of these strategies from the perspectives of NUMs and their supervisors. NUMs (N = 22) and directors of nursing (N = 3) were interviewed for this study. Thematic analysis revealed 14 challenges relating primarily to NUMs interactions with others, both within and outside of their wards/units. These challenges related to the managerial, but not clinical, aspects of their roles; 16 strategies for managing these challenges were identified, the effectiveness of which seemed dependent on how well they were executed. The strategies are: seeking assistance and support; trial and error; satisficing; taking responsibility for own professional development; scheduling of time; working longer hours; delegation; adaptive staffing and rostering; being a visible presence on the ward; team development; facilitating professional development for staff; being available for staff, negotiation and collaboration; communication; working with the processes of a large organisation; and complying with the demands of others, The findings make a strong case for NUMs to be supported in undertaking comprehensive management education.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1833367200000572
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
1503 Business And Management
1505 Marketing
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, eContent Management
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075480

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
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