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Policy responses to address student “brain drain”: An assessment of measures intended to reduce the emigration of singaporean international students

Ziguras, Christopher and Gribble, Cate 2015, Policy responses to address student “brain drain”: An assessment of measures intended to reduce the emigration of singaporean international students, Journal of studies in international education, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 246-264, doi: 10.1177/1028315314561121.

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Title Policy responses to address student “brain drain”: An assessment of measures intended to reduce the emigration of singaporean international students
Author(s) Ziguras, Christopher
Gribble, Cate
Journal name Journal of studies in international education
Volume number 19
Issue number 3
Start page 246
End page 264
Total pages 19
Publisher Sage
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-07
ISSN 1028-3153
1552-7808
Keyword(s) degree mobility
international migration
brain drain
brain circulation
migration policy
Social Sciences
Education & Educational Research
2ND CHANCE
EDUCATION
Summary For several decades,Singapore has experienced a high rate of outbound degree mobility with around 1 in 10 higher education students currently studying outside the country according to UNESCO figures. Singapore’s successful economic development strategy, which has seen it become a key Asian hub for knowledge-intensive industries for internationalized services, has benefited from the presence of large numbers of graduates who have been educated abroad. However, significant numbers of Singaporean students do not return home after their studies, and since the late 1990s, the government has expressed concern about the resulting “brain drain.” This article examines four strategies that have been used by the Singapore government to address this concern: reducing the number of outbound students through improvements to domestic study options, promoting the return of graduates after their studies, engagement with the Singaporean diaspora, and recruitment of incoming international students into the workforce. While data are limited, the measures adopted to support each of these approaches appear to have had some success over the past decade. While the circumstances of each sending country vary, the case of Singapore is illustrative of the types of practical measures that are effectively adopted by governments to moderate the negative impacts of student emigration.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/1028315314561121
Field of Research 130103 Higher Education
13 Education
Socio Economic Objective 930501 Education and Training Systems Policies and Development
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Sage
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075529

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Education
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