You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs)

Zhang, Tao, Xu, Zhinguang, Cai, Zengxiao and Guo, Qipeng 2015, Phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs), Physical chemistry chemical physics, vol. 17, no. 24, pp. 16033-16039, doi: 10.1039/c5cp01157d.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
zhang-phaseinversion-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 912.66KB 124

Title Phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs)
Author(s) Zhang, Tao
Xu, Zhinguang
Cai, Zengxiao
Guo, Qipeng
Journal name Physical chemistry chemical physics
Volume number 17
Issue number 24
Start page 16033
End page 16039
Total pages 7
Publisher Royal Society of Chemistry
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2015-06-28
ISSN 1463-9084
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Physical Sciences
Chemistry, Physical
Physics, Atomic, Molecular & Chemical
Chemistry
Physics
IN-OIL EMULSIONS
STAR CCS POLYMERS
SULFONATED POLYSTYRENE
WATER EMULSIONS
POROUS POLYMERS
BLOCK IONOMER
SURFACTANT
MORPHOLOGY
ORGANOGELS
PARTICLES
Summary Herein, we report the phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) induced by salt concentration and pH changes. The ionomers are sulfonated polystyrenes (SPSs) with different sulfonation degrees. The emulsion types were determined by conductivity measurements, confocal microscopy and optical microscopy, and the formation of HIPE organogels was verified by the tube-inversion method and rheological measurements. SPSs with high sulfonation degrees (water-soluble) and low sulfonation degrees (water-insoluble) can stabilize oil-in-water emulsions; these emulsions were transformed into water-in-oil HIPEs by varying salt concentrations and/or changing the pH. SPS, with a sulfonation degree of 11.6%, is the most efficient, and as low as 0.2 (w/v)% of the organic phase is enough to stabilize the HIPEs. Phase inversion of the oil-in-water emulsions occurred to form water-in-oil HIPEs by increasing the salt concentration in the aqueous phase. Two phase inversion points from oil-in-water emulsions to water-in-oil HIPEs were observed at pH 1 and 13. Moreover, synergetic effects between the salt concentration and pH changes occurred upon the inversion of the emulsion type. The organic phase can be a variety of organic solvents, including toluene, xylene, chloroform, dichloroethane, dichloromethane and anisole, as well as monomers such as styrene, butyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. Poly(HIPEs) were successfully prepared by the polymerization of monomers as the continuous phase in the ionomer-stabilized HIPEs.
Language eng
DOI 10.1039/c5cp01157d
Field of Research 091209 Polymers and Plastics
Socio Economic Objective 860607 Plastic Products (incl. Construction Materials)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Royal Society of Chemistry
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075552

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 127 Abstract Views, 125 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2015, 15:02:01 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.