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Reverse logistics (RL) implementation among contractors in Australia: practices and barriers

Chileshe, Nicholas, Rameezdeen, Raufdeen, Lehmann, Steffen and Hosseini, Mohammad Reza 2014, Reverse logistics (RL) implementation among contractors in Australia: practices and barriers, in ARCOM 2014 : Proceedings of the 30th Association of Researchers in Construction Management Annual Conference, ARCOM, Reading, Eng., pp. 83-92.

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Title Reverse logistics (RL) implementation among contractors in Australia: practices and barriers
Author(s) Chileshe, Nicholas
Rameezdeen, Raufdeen
Lehmann, Steffen
Hosseini, Mohammad RezaORCID iD for Hosseini, Mohammad Reza orcid.org/0000-0001-8675-736X
Conference name Association of Researchers in Construction Management. Annual Conference (30th : 2014 : Portsmouth, England)
Conference location Portsmouth, England
Conference dates 2014/09/01 - 2014/09/03
Title of proceedings ARCOM 2014 : Proceedings of the 30th Association of Researchers in Construction Management Annual Conference
Publication date 2014
Conference series Association of Researchers in Construction Management Annual Conference
Start page 83
End page 92
Total pages 10
Publisher ARCOM
Place of publication Reading, Eng.
Keyword(s) reverse logistics
barriers
supply chain management
Summary This paper aims to investigate the perceptions of Australian contractors concerning the prevailing practices and barriers to the implementation of reverse logistics (RL). A review of literature identified 18 practices and 16 barriers to the implementation of RL. Using a triangulated data collection approach, 6 semi-structured interviews and 49 questionnaires were used to collect data. The quantitative survey data was subjected to descriptive and inferential statistics with correlation analysis to examine the strength of relationship among the barriers, whereas content analysis was employed for the interview data. The results indicated the following barriers as most significant: (i) lack of incorporation of salvaged materials by designers; (ii) regulation restrictions to usage of recovered materials and components; (iii) potential legal liabilities; (iv) higher costs; and (v) longer time associated with deconstructing buildings. Relative to the prevailing practices, the top five ranked were as follows: (i) reduction of waste on projects; (ii) clearer understanding of the benefits; (iii) clearer understanding of the challenges; (iv) clearer understanding of the different aspects of reusing building materials; and (v) Enhancing the green image of the organisation. The results of the interviews also confirmed the findings from the survey, and identified the following barriers: (i) lack of support from the government in terms of financial incentives to increase the competitiveness of reused and salvaged items in the market; (ii) The attached stigma and resistance of supervisors, designers, and some authorities towards using salvaged and reused materials; and (iii) Technical barriers associated with usage of salvaged materials. The majority of the interviewees identified economic issues as the major drivers of RL practices. The identified barriers could be used as a 'road map' for the development of appropriate solutions for the successful implementation of RL, and to improve the environmental related decision making processes of the contractors.
ISBN 9780955239083
Language eng
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2014, ARCOM
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075626

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.