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Migration and Pacific mortality: estimating migration effects on Pacific mortality rates using Bayesian models.

Richardson, Ken, Jatrana, Santosh, Tobias, Martin and Blakely, Tony 2013, Migration and Pacific mortality: estimating migration effects on Pacific mortality rates using Bayesian models., Demography, vol. 50, no. 6, pp. 2053-2073, doi: 10.1007/s13524-013-0234-0.

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Title Migration and Pacific mortality: estimating migration effects on Pacific mortality rates using Bayesian models.
Author(s) Richardson, Ken
Jatrana, Santosh
Tobias, Martin
Blakely, Tony
Journal name Demography
Volume number 50
Issue number 6
Start page 2053
End page 2073
Total pages 21
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Place of publication New York, United States
Publication date 2013-12
ISSN 0070-3370
Keyword(s) New Zealand
Pacific migrants
Mortality
Hierarchical Bayesian model
Duration of residence
Summary Pacific people living in New Zealand have higher mortality rates than New Zealand residents of European/Other ethnicity. The aim of this paper is to see whether Pacific mortality rates vary by natality and duration of residence. We used linked census-mortality information for 25- to 74-year-olds in the 2001 census followed for up to three years. Hierarchical Bayesian modeling provided a means of handling sparse data. Posterior mortality rates were directly age-standardized. We found little evidence of mortality differences between the overseas-born and the New Zealand-born for all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. However, we found evidence for lower all-cause (and possibly cancer and CVD) mortality rates for Pacific migrants resident in New Zealand for less than 25 years relative to those resident for more than 25 years. This result may arise from a combination of processes operating over time, including health selection effects from variations in New Zealand's immigration policy, the location of Pacific migrants within the social, political, and cultural environment of the host community, and health impacts of the host culture. We could not determine the relative importance of these processes, but identifying the (modifiable) drivers of the inferred long-term decline in health of the overseas-born Pacific population relative to more-recent Pacific migrants is important to Pacific communities and from a national health and policy perspective.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s13524-013-0234-0
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1603 Demography
Socio Economic Objective 940204 Public Services Policy Advice and Analysis
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Population Association of America
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075654

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Alfred Deakin Research Institute
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.