Long-distance endozoochorous dispersal of submerged macrophyte seeds by migratory waterbirds in northern Europe - a critical review of possibilities and limitations

Clausen, Preben, Nolet, Bart A., Fox, A.D. and Klaassen, Marcel 2002, Long-distance endozoochorous dispersal of submerged macrophyte seeds by migratory waterbirds in northern Europe - a critical review of possibilities and limitations, Acta oecologica, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 191-203, doi: 10.1016/S1146-609X(02)01150-5.

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Title Long-distance endozoochorous dispersal of submerged macrophyte seeds by migratory waterbirds in northern Europe - a critical review of possibilities and limitations
Author(s) Clausen, Preben
Nolet, Bart A.
Fox, A.D.
Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Journal name Acta oecologica
Volume number 23
Issue number 3
Start page 191
End page 203
Total pages 13
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2002-06
ISSN 1146-609X
Keyword(s) Anas
Branta
Cygnus
Potamogeton
Ruppia
Zostera
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
GEESE BRANTA-BERNICLA
NUTRIENT-RESERVE DYNAMICS
DUTCH WADDEN SEA
BRENT GEESE
SOUTHERN ENGLAND
DIGESTIVE ORGANS
ZOSTERA-NOLTII
GUT MORPHOLOGY
FLIGHT SPEEDS
DIET
Summary We review whether migratory Anatidae, i.e., swans, geese and ducks, could be acting as vectors for dispersal of Zostera, Ruppia and Potamogeton propagules by endozoochory (carrying seeds in their guts). We list six prerequisites that must all be fulfilled, if successful dispersal should occur. Several Anatidae species feed on these macrophytes, and undertake rapid long-distance movements, making dispersal possible. We identify four problems, which in combination leads us to conclude that long-distance dispersal events are likely to be rare. (i) Most long-distance movements are out of phase with the reproductive efforts of the plants, and if birds arrive at sites when plants still bear seeds, they are likely to depart well after seed stocks have been depleted. (ii) Seed transport by birds will usually be uni-directional, from north to south on autumn migrations. (iii) Most of the gut contents of migratory birds are likely to have been discarded within 300 km of departure. (iv) In many cases, birds will arrive in habitats seriously different from those they departed, i.e., any seeds carried along will have low chances of surviving in their new site. We suggest that northbound dispersal by endozoochory can only occur during spring if waterbirds feed on seeds that have not been depleted and remained frozen down or buried in sediments, or during moult- or post-moult migrations. Moult migration takes place in summer in phase with the reproductive efforts of the plants. Also epizoochorous dispersal (external attachment) is subject to restrictions i, ii and iv.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/S1146-609X(02)01150-5
Field of Research 060299 Ecology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2002, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075850

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