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Links between copper and cholesterol in Alzheimer's disease

Hung, Ya Hui, Bush, Ashley I and La Fontaine, Sharon 2013, Links between copper and cholesterol in Alzheimer's disease, Frontiers in physiology, vol. 4, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.3389/fphys.2013.00111.

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Title Links between copper and cholesterol in Alzheimer's disease
Author(s) Hung, Ya Hui
Bush, Ashley I
La Fontaine, SharonORCID iD for La Fontaine, Sharon orcid.org/0000-0002-9948-074X
Journal name Frontiers in physiology
Volume number 4
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2013-05
ISSN 1664-042X
Keyword(s) Alzheimer's disease
ApoE

amyloid precursor protein
cholesterol
copper
lipid rafts
tau
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physiology
A beta
AMYLOID-PRECURSOR-PROTEIN
CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM
BLOOD-BRAIN-BARRIER
CUPRIZONE-INDUCED DEMYELINATION
APOLIPOPROTEIN-E GENOTYPES
MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
PRIMARY NEURONAL CULTURES
GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
PURIFIED NPC1 PROTEIN
NIEMANN-PICK DISEASE
Summary Altered copper homeostasis and hypercholesterolemia have been identified independently as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Abnormal copper and cholesterol metabolism are implicated in the genesis of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), which are two key pathological signatures of AD. Amyloidogenic processing of a sub-population of amyloid precursor protein (APP) that produces Aβ occurs in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in copper deficient AD brains. Co-localization of Aβ and a paradoxical high concentration of copper in lipid rafts fosters the formation of neurotoxic Aβ:copper complexes. These complexes can catalytically oxidize cholesterol to generate H2O2, oxysterols and other lipid peroxidation products that accumulate in brains of AD cases and transgenic mouse models. Tau, the core protein component of NFTs, is sensitive to interactions with copper and cholesterol, which trigger a cascade of hyperphosphorylation and aggregation preceding the generation of NFTs. Here we present an overview of copper and cholesterol metabolism in the brain, and how their integrated failure contributes to development of AD.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2013.00111
Field of Research 060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified
059999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Hung, Bush and La Fontaine
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075926

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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