Use of antiseptic hand rubs in the health and community services industry: an Australian population-based survey

MacFarlane, Ewan, LaMontagne, Anthony D., Driscoll, Tim, Nixon, Rosemary L. and Keegel, Tessa 2015, Use of antiseptic hand rubs in the health and community services industry: an Australian population-based survey, Contact dermatitis, vol. 73, no. 3, pp. 157-162, doi: 10.1111/cod.12399.

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Title Use of antiseptic hand rubs in the health and community services industry: an Australian population-based survey
Author(s) MacFarlane, Ewan
LaMontagne, Anthony D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Driscoll, Tim
Nixon, Rosemary L.
Keegel, Tessa
Journal name Contact dermatitis
Volume number 73
Issue number 3
Start page 157
End page 162
Total pages 6
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2015-09
ISSN 1600-0536
Keyword(s) antiseptic hand rubs
nurses
wet work
Summary BACKGROUND: The use of antiseptic hand rubs (AHRs), rather than washing with soap and water, is considered to be the gold standard for reducing the frequency of nosocomial infections, as well as being less damaging to the hands than washing with soap and water, but little is known at a population level about usage patterns for AHRs. OBJECTIVES: To describe AHR use patterns among workers in the health and community services industry in Australia. METHODS: Using data from a population-based survey of Australian workers, we focused on health and community services workers' exposure to chemicals at work, including the use of AHRs. Data regarding the frequency of hand-washing were also collected. RESULTS: Nine hundred and fifty-six health and community service workers participated in the Australian National Hazard Exposure Worker Surveillance survey. Of these, 11% reported using AHRs, and 31% reported hand-washing >20 times per shift. According to an adjusted logistic regression model, professional workers [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.29, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.40-3.72] and frequent hand washers (aOR 3.08, 95%CI: 1.92-4.93) were more likely to use AHRs. CONCLUSIONS: AHR use by health and community service workers was generally lower than expected. AHR use was most likely to be reported by professionals and frequent hand washers, suggesting that AHRs are used as an adjunct to conventional hand-washing.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/cod.12399
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075931

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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