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"Games are fun and aren't just for boys": an assessment of female game players use and playing habits of video games

Nichol, Sophie, Lanham, Elicia and Bowtell, Gregory 2010, "Games are fun and aren't just for boys": an assessment of female game players use and playing habits of video games, in CGAT 2010 : Proceedings of the 3rd Annual International Conference on Computer Games, Multimedia and Allied Technology, Asia Pacific Technology Forum, Singapore, pp. 232-237.

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Title "Games are fun and aren't just for boys": an assessment of female game players use and playing habits of video games
Author(s) Nichol, SophieORCID iD for Nichol, Sophie orcid.org/0000-0001-5803-640X
Lanham, Elicia
Bowtell, Gregory
Conference name Computer Games, Multimedia and Allied Technology. Annual International Conference (3rd : 2010 : Singapore)
Conference location Singapore
Conference dates 6-7 Apr. 2010
Title of proceedings CGAT 2010 : Proceedings of the 3rd Annual International Conference on Computer Games, Multimedia and Allied Technology
Editor(s) Prakash, Edmond C.
Publication date 2010
Start page 232
End page 237
Total pages 6
Publisher Asia Pacific Technology Forum
Place of publication Singapore
Summary Video games have asserted themselves as a prevalent part of society; however video games are still often seen as 'boys toys'. However, popular culture is becoming accepting that video games are played by females, with 'all female' video games teams such as the 'Frag Dolls' winning many international competitions [4]. The gender issue in video games is not a new topic, with texts such as 'From Barbie to Mortal Combat' edited by Cassell and Jenkins being publishing in 1998. However, the question of 'do females actually play video games' is still apparent, and with the rapid changes in technological development in gaming (with the introduction of consoles such as the Nintendo Wii) the subject of females game playing habits is in need of constant dialogue. This paper explores the results from a survey of 33 Australian females who play video games and looks at the game playing habits and choices made when they play video games. In addition, this study will attempt to address what components of video games make females want to play. It is hoped that the results can enlighten our knowledge of why females play video games, and hopefully assert the need for video games as an important pastime for females and not just 'for the boys'.
ISBN 9789810854799
Language eng
Field of Research 080602 Computer-Human Interaction
Socio Economic Objective 970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
HERDC Research category E3.1 Extract of paper
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2010, Asia Pacific Technology Forum
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075943

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Information Technology
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