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Self-organised nanoarchitecture of titanium surfaces influences the attachment of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria

Truong, Vi Khanh, Pham, Vy T. H., Medvedev, Alexander, Lapovok, Rimma, Estrin, Yuri, Lowe, Terry C., Baulin, Vladimir, Boshkovikj, Veselin, Fluke, Christopher J., Crawford, Russell J. and Ivanova, Elena P. 2015, Self-organised nanoarchitecture of titanium surfaces influences the attachment of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, Applied microbiology and biotechnology, vol. 99, no. 16, pp. 6831-6840, doi: 10.1007/s00253-015-6572-7.

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Title Self-organised nanoarchitecture of titanium surfaces influences the attachment of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria
Author(s) Truong, Vi Khanh
Pham, Vy T. H.
Medvedev, Alexander
Lapovok, Rimma
Estrin, Yuri
Lowe, Terry C.
Baulin, Vladimir
Boshkovikj, Veselin
Fluke, Christopher J.
Crawford, Russell J.
Ivanova, Elena P.
Journal name Applied microbiology and biotechnology
Volume number 99
Issue number 16
Start page 6831
End page 6840
Total pages 10
Publisher Springer
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2015-08
ISSN 1432-0614
Keyword(s) Bacterial attachment
Molecularly smooth surfaces
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Staphylococcus aureus
Surface nanoarchitecture
Summary The surface nanotopography and architecture of medical implant devices are important factors that can control the extent of bacterial attachment. The ability to prevent bacterial attachment substantially reduces the possibility of a patient receiving an implant contracting an implant-borne infection. We now demonstrated that two bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, exhibited different attachment affinities towards two types of molecularly smooth titanium surfaces each possessing a different nanoarchitecture. It was found that the attachment of S. aureus cells was not restricted on surfaces that had an average roughness (S a) less than 0.5 nm. In contrast, P. aeruginosa cells were found to be unable to colonise surfaces possessing an average roughness below 1 nm, unless sharp nanoprotrusions of approximately 20 nm in size and spaced 35.0 nm apart were present. It is postulated that the enhanced attachment of P. aeruginosa onto the surfaces possessing these nanoprotrusions was facilitated by the ability of the cell membrane to stretch over the tips of the nanoprotrusions as confirmed through computer simulation, together with a concomitant increase in the level of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) being produced by the bacterial cells.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00253-015-6572-7
Field of Research 091207 Metals and Alloy Materials
090301 Biomaterials
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075946

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Institute for Frontier Materials
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