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Effect of increasing dietary calcium through supplements and dairy food on body weight and body composition: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

Booth, Alison O., Huggins, Catherine E., Wattanapenpaiboon, Naiyana and Nowson, Caryl A. 2015, Effect of increasing dietary calcium through supplements and dairy food on body weight and body composition: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials, British journal of nutrition, vol. 114, no. 7, pp. 1013-1025.

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Title Effect of increasing dietary calcium through supplements and dairy food on body weight and body composition: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
Author(s) Booth, Alison O.ORCID iD for Booth, Alison O. orcid.org/0000-0003-4914-7006
Huggins, Catherine E.
Wattanapenpaiboon, Naiyana
Nowson, Caryl A.ORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl A. orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 114
Issue number 7
Start page 1013
End page 1025
Total pages 13
Publisher Cambridge Univeristy Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2015-10
ISSN 1475-2662
Keyword(s) Body composition
Body weight
Calcium
Meta-analysis
Summary This meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials assessed the effect of Ca on body weight and body composition through supplementation or increasing dairy food intake. Forty-one studies met the inclusion criteria (including fifty-one trial arms; thirty-one with dairy foods (n 2091), twenty with Ca supplements (n 2711). Ca intake was approximately 900 mg/d higher in the supplement groups compared with control. In the dairy group, Ca intake was approximately 1300 mg/d. Ca supplementation did not significantly affect body weight (mean change ( - 0·17, 95 % CI - 0·70, 0·37) kg) or body fat (mean change ( - 0·19, 95 % CI - 0·51, 0·13) kg) compared to control. Similarly, increased dairy food intake did not affect body weight ( - 0·06, 95 % CI - 0·54, 0·43) kg or body fat change ( - 0·36, 95 % CI - 0·80, 0·09) kg compared to control. Sub-analyses revealed that dairy supplementation resulted in no change in body weight (nineteen studies, n 1010) ( - 0·32, 95 % CI - 0·93, 0·30 kg, P= 0·31), but a greater reduction in body fat (thirteen studies, n 564) ( - 0·96, 95 % CI - 1·46, - 0·46 kg, P < 0·001) in the presence of energy restriction over a mean of 4 months compared to control. Increasing dietary Ca intake by 900 mg/d as supplements or increasing dairy intake to approximately 3 servings daily (approximately 1300 mg of Ca/d) is not an effective weight reduction strategy in adults. There is, however, an indication that approximately 3 servings of dairy may facilitate fat loss on weight reduction diets in the short term.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30075980

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