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Effects of diet change on carbon and nitrogen stable-isotope ratios in blood cells and plasma of the long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta)

Klaassen, Marcel, Thums, Michele and Hume, Ian D. 2004, Effects of diet change on carbon and nitrogen stable-isotope ratios in blood cells and plasma of the long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta), Australian journal of zoology, vol. 52, no. 6, pp. 635-647, doi: 10.1071/ZO04029.

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Title Effects of diet change on carbon and nitrogen stable-isotope ratios in blood cells and plasma of the long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta)
Author(s) Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Thums, Michele
Hume, Ian D.
Journal name Australian journal of zoology
Volume number 52
Issue number 6
Start page 635
End page 647
Total pages 13
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2004
ISSN 0004-959X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Zoology
TISSUE FRACTIONATION
ECOLOGY
TURNOVER
MARSUPIALS
DELTA-C-13
CLIMATE
C-13
Summary Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotopes offer a powerful tool for assessing the extent of tissue assimilation of dietary components. However, the method relies on knowledge of diet-tissue isotopic discrimination and how quickly diet shifts become apparent in various tissues. In the present study, blood plasma and blood cells, tissues that are easily obtained under field conditions, were used to validate the stable isotope method over a period of 4-5 weeks using captive long-nosed bandicoots (Perameles nasuta). Diet-tissue discrimination effects appeared to be small. For C, derived diet-tissue isotopic discriminations were 1.4‰ for blood plasma and -0.2‰ for blood cells. For N the values were 2.8‰ and 2.1‰, respectively, and were independent of the nitrogen content of the food. C and N turnover measurements in the blood plasma and cells of the bandicoots indicated that blood plasma provides dietary information integrated over a period of ∼3 weeks, whereas blood cells give an impression of the assimilated diet over a period of as much as half a year. These turnover rates were low compared with the little information available for birds and eutherian mammals, and probably relate to the typically low metabolic rate of marsupials.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/ZO04029
Field of Research 060603 Animal Physiology - Systems
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, CSIRO
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076013

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