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Fathers with highly demanding partners and offspring in a semidesert environment: energetic aspects of the breeding system of Monteiro's Hornbills (Tockus monteiri) in Namibia

Klaassen, Marcel, Brenninkmeijer, Alex, Boix-Hinzen, Christian and Mendelsohn, John 2003, Fathers with highly demanding partners and offspring in a semidesert environment: energetic aspects of the breeding system of Monteiro's Hornbills (Tockus monteiri) in Namibia, Auk, vol. 120, no. 3, pp. 866-873, doi: 10.1642/0004-8038(2003)120[0866:FWHDPA]2.0.CO;2.

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Title Fathers with highly demanding partners and offspring in a semidesert environment: energetic aspects of the breeding system of Monteiro's Hornbills (Tockus monteiri) in Namibia
Author(s) Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Brenninkmeijer, Alex
Boix-Hinzen, Christian
Mendelsohn, John
Journal name Auk
Volume number 120
Issue number 3
Start page 866
End page 873
Total pages 8
Publisher BioOne
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2003-07
ISSN 0004-8038
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ornithology
Zoology
METABOLIC-RATE
BODY-SIZE
CIRCADIAN PHASE
GROWTH
TROPICS
CHICKS
RATES
BIRDS
MOLT
Summary Molting females of Monteiro's Hornbills (Tockus monteiri) seal themselves in nest cavities to breed until chicks are about half grown. To gain insight into the chronology of energy requirements of the Monteiro's Hornbill family unit in relation to this peculiar breeding strategy, we measured a number of ecological, physiological, and environmental variables during the Monteiro's Hornbill's breeding season. Those measurements included rates of energy expenditure of female Monteiro's Hornbills while in the nest cavity, characterizing their thermal environment, timing of egg laying, molt, hatching and fledging of chicks, as well as measuring clutch size and chick growth. Temperatures within the nest box varied between 12 and 39°C and did not affect the female energy expenditure. Female body mass and energy expenditure averaged 319 g and 5 W, respectively, at the start of concealment and decreased by on average 1.1 g day -1 and 0.05 W day -1 during at least the first 30 days of the 52-58 day concealment period. Clutch size varied between 1 and 8 and averaged 4.1 eggs, with eggs averaging only 66% of the mass predicted for a bird of this size. Over the range of chick ages at which the female might leave the nest, the predicted energy requirements for maintenance and tissue growth for a Monteiro's Hornbill chick increase sharply from 1.2 W at age 8 to 3.0 W at age 25. Reduction of the female energy requirement with time, the relatively low growth rate and therewith low energy requirements of Monteiro's Hornbill chicks, and an appropriate timing of the female's exodus from the nest cavity all aid in containing peak energy demands to levels that are sustainable for the food provisioning male.
Language eng
DOI 10.1642/0004-8038(2003)120[0866:FWHDPA]2.0.CO;2
Field of Research 060801 Animal Behaviour
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2003, American Ornithologists' Union
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076016

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