You are not logged in.

Geographical variation and population structure in the White-rumped Sandpiper Calidris fuscicollis as shown by morphology, mitochondrial DNA and carbon isotope ratios

Wennerberg, Liv, Klaassen, Marcel and Lindström, Åke 2002, Geographical variation and population structure in the White-rumped Sandpiper Calidris fuscicollis as shown by morphology, mitochondrial DNA and carbon isotope ratios, Oecologia, vol. 131, no. 3, pp. 380-390, doi: 10.1007/s00442-002-0890-z.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Geographical variation and population structure in the White-rumped Sandpiper Calidris fuscicollis as shown by morphology, mitochondrial DNA and carbon isotope ratios
Author(s) Wennerberg, Liv
Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Lindström, Åke
Journal name Oecologia
Volume number 131
Issue number 3
Start page 380
End page 390
Total pages 11
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2002-05
ISSN 0029-8549
Keyword(s) mtDNA sequencing
Phylogeography
Population genetics
Principal component analysis
Stable isotopes analysis
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
CONTROL-REGION SEQUENCES
WINTERING GROUNDS
STABLE ISOTOPES
ALPINA
MIGRATION
FEATHERS
DUNLIN
BIRDS
SHOREBIRDS
Summary We studied the population structure of a high arctic breeding wader bird species, the White-rumped Sandpiper Calidris fuscicollis. Breeding adults, chicks and juveniles were sampled at seven localities throughout the species' breeding range in arctic Canada in 1999. The mitochondrial control region was analysed by DNA sequencing, feathers were analysed for carbon isotope ratios (C13/C12) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry, and morphological measurements were analysed using principal component analyses, taking the effect of sex into account (identified by molecular genetic methods). In general, our results support the notion that the White-rumped Sandpiper is a monotypic species with no subspecies, and most of the morphological and genetic variation occurs within sites. Nevertheless, some differences between sites were found. Birds from the two northernmost sites (Ellesmere and Devon Islands) had relatively longer bill and wing and shorter tarsus than birds sampled further south, possibly reflecting genetic differences between populations. The carbon isotope ratios were higher at the easternmost site (Baffin Island), revealing differences in the isotope content of the food. The mtDNA sequences showed no significant differentiation between sites and no pattern of isolation-by-distance was found. Based on the mtDNA variation, the species was estimated to have a long-term effective population size of approximately 9,000 females. The species shows no clear evidence of any population expansion or decline. Our results indicate that carbon isotope ratios, and possibly also certain mtDNA haplotypes, may be useful as tools for identifying the breeding origin of White-rumped Sandpipers on migration and wintering sites.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00442-002-0890-z
Field of Research 060299 Ecology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2002, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076021

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 22 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 25 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 130 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 20 Aug 2015, 15:47:13 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.