You are not logged in.

Energetics of fattening and starvation in the long-distance migratory garden warbler, Sylvia borin, during the migratory phase

Klaassen, M. and Biebach, H. 1994, Energetics of fattening and starvation in the long-distance migratory garden warbler, Sylvia borin, during the migratory phase, Journal of comparative physiology B, vol. 164, no. 5, pp. 362-371, doi: 10.1007/BF00302551.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Energetics of fattening and starvation in the long-distance migratory garden warbler, Sylvia borin, during the migratory phase
Author(s) Klaassen, M.ORCID iD for Klaassen, M. orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Biebach, H.
Journal name Journal of comparative physiology B
Volume number 164
Issue number 5
Start page 362
End page 371
Total pages 10
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 1994-10
ISSN 0174-1578
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physiology
Zoology
ENERGETICS
MIGRATION
FATTENING
STARVATION
GARDEN WARBLER
SYLVIA BORIN
CATBIRD DUMETELLA-CAROLINENSIS
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS
FAT DEPOSITION
BODY-COMPOSITION
BEHAVIORAL-RESPONSES
ENERGY-EXPENDITURE
FOOD-DEPRIVATION
SPRING MIGRATION
ORGAN SIZE
BIRDS
Summary Garden warblers (Sylvia borin) were subjected to starvation trials during their autumnal migratory phase in order to simulate a period of non-stop migration. Before, during and after this treatment the energy expenditure, activity, food intake and body mass of the subjects were monitored. Assimilation efficiency was constant throughout the experiments. The catabolized (during starvation) and deposited body tissue (during recovery) consisted of 73% fat. Basal metabolic rate was decreased during the starvation period and tended to a gradual increase during the recovery period. The reduced basal metabolic rate can possibly be attributed to a reduced size/function of the digestive system, which is consistent with the sub-maximal food intake immediately after resuming the supply of food to the experimental birds. The observed reductions in basal metabolic rate during starvation and activity during recovery can be viewed as adaptations contributing to a higher economization of energy supplies. The experimental birds were unable to eat large quantities of food directly after a period of starvation leading to a comparatively low, or no increase in body mass. Such a slow mass increase is in agreement with observations of migratory birds on arrival at stop-over sites.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/BF00302551
Field of Research 060603 Animal Physiology - Systems
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©1994, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076031

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 105 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 103 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 108 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 20 Aug 2015, 15:50:07 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.