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Elevated hydrogen peroxide and decreased catalase and glutathione peroxidase protection are associated with aging sarcopenia

Sullivan-Gunn, Melanie J. and Lewandowski, Paul A. 2013, Elevated hydrogen peroxide and decreased catalase and glutathione peroxidase protection are associated with aging sarcopenia, BMC geriatrics, vol. 13, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/1471-2318-13-104.

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Title Elevated hydrogen peroxide and decreased catalase and glutathione peroxidase protection are associated with aging sarcopenia
Author(s) Sullivan-Gunn, Melanie J.
Lewandowski, Paul A.
Journal name BMC geriatrics
Volume number 13
Article ID 104
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013-10-07
ISSN 1471-2318
Keyword(s) Aging
Animals
Antioxidants
Biomarkers
Catalase
Female
Glutathione Peroxidase
Hydrogen Peroxide
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Muscle, Skeletal
Oxidative Stress
Sarcopenia
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Geriatrics & Gerontology
Gerontology
NADPH oxidase
Superoxide
Summary BACKGROUND: Sarcopenia is the progressive loss of skeletal muscle that contributes to the decline in physical function during aging. A higher level of oxidative stress has been implicated in aging sarcopenia. The current study aims to determine if the higher level of oxidative stress is a result of increased superoxide (O2‾) production by the NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzyme or decrease in endogenous antioxidant enzyme protection. METHODS: Female Balb/c mice were assigned to 4 age groups; 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Body weight and animal survival rates were recorded over the course of the study. Skeletal muscle tissues were collected and used to measure NOX subunit mRNA, O2‾ levels and antioxidant enzymes.
RESULTS: Key subunit components of NOX expression were elevated in skeletal muscle at 18 months, when sarcopenia was first evident. Increased superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) activity suggests an increase in O2‾ dismutation and this was further supported by elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and decline in catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) antioxidant protection in skeletal muscle at this time. NOX expression was also higher in skeletal muscle at 24 months, however this was coupled with elevated levels of O2‾ and a decline in SOD1 activity, compared to 6 and 12 months but was not associated with further loss of muscle mass.
CONCLUSIONS: While the source of ROS in sarcopenic muscle remains unknown, this study provides evidence that the NOX enzyme could be involved in ROS production by regulating superoxide in ageing muscles. This study also suggests that H2O2 is the key ROS in the onset of sarcopenia and that the decline in antioxidant protection by catalase and GPx is indicative of antioxidant dysfunction and may therefore be a major contributing factor in the development or onset of sarcopenia. Furthermore, the changes in ROS and antioxidant activity after sarcopenia was first evident gives some evidence for a compensatory mechanism, in response to insult, in order to maintain muscle integrity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2318-13-104
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Sullivan-Gunn and Lewandowski
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076098

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.