You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

What is the most effective way of increasing the bioavailability of dietary long chain omega-3 fatty acids-daily vs. weekly administration of fish oil?

Ghasemifard, Samaneh, Sinclair, Andrew J., Kaur, Gunveen, Lewandowski, Paul and Turchini, Giovanni M. 2015, What is the most effective way of increasing the bioavailability of dietary long chain omega-3 fatty acids-daily vs. weekly administration of fish oil?, Nutrients, vol. 7, no. 7, pp. 5628-5645, doi: 10.3390/nu7075241.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
sinclair-whatisthemost-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 386.03KB 6

Title What is the most effective way of increasing the bioavailability of dietary long chain omega-3 fatty acids-daily vs. weekly administration of fish oil?
Author(s) Ghasemifard, Samaneh
Sinclair, Andrew J.
Kaur, Gunveen
Lewandowski, Paul
Turchini, Giovanni M.ORCID iD for Turchini, Giovanni M. orcid.org/0000-0003-0694-4283
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 7
Issue number 7
Start page 5628
End page 5645
Total pages 18
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-07
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) DHA
DPA
EPA
bioavailability
frequency of intake
metabolic fate
tissue deposition
Summary The recommendations on the intake of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA) vary from eating oily fish ("once to twice per week") to consuming specified daily amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ("250-500 mg per day"). It is not known if there is a difference in the uptake/bioavailability between regular daily consumption of supplementsvs. consuming fish once or twice per week. In this study, the bioavailability of a daily dose of n-3 LC-PUFA (Constant treatment), representing supplements, vs. a large weekly dose of n-3 LC-PUFA (Spike treatment), representing consuming once or twice per week, was assessed. Six-week old healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a Constant treatment, a Spike treatment or Control treatment (no n-3 LC-PUFA), for six weeks. The whole body, tissues and faeces were analysed for fatty acid content. The results showed that the major metabolic fate of the n-3 LC-PUFA (EPA+docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) + DHA) was towards catabolism (β-oxidation) accounting for over 70% of total dietary intake, whereas deposition accounted less than 25% of total dietary intake. It was found that significantly more n-3 LC-PUFA were β-oxidised when originating from the Constant treatment (84% of dose), compared with the Spike treatment (75% of dose). Conversely, it was found that significantly more n-3 LC-PUFA were deposited when originating from the Spike treatment (23% of dose), than from the Constant treatment (15% of dose). These unexpected findings show that a large dose of n-3 LC-PUFA once per week is more effective in increasing whole body n-3 LC-PUFA content in rats compared with a smaller dose delivered daily.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu7075241
Field of Research 111103 Nutritional Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076099

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 123 Abstract Views, 7 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 21 Aug 2015, 11:15:34 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.