Feeding ecology of King George whiting Sillaginodes punctatus (Perciformes) recruits in seagrass and unvegetated habitats. Does diet reflect habitat utilization?

Jenkins, G.P., Syme, A. and Macreadie, P.I. 2011, Feeding ecology of King George whiting Sillaginodes punctatus (Perciformes) recruits in seagrass and unvegetated habitats. Does diet reflect habitat utilization?, Journal of fish biology, vol. 78, no. 5, pp. 1561-1573, doi: 10.1111/j.1095-8649.2011.02962.x.

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Title Feeding ecology of King George whiting Sillaginodes punctatus (Perciformes) recruits in seagrass and unvegetated habitats. Does diet reflect habitat utilization?
Author(s) Jenkins, G.P.
Syme, A.
Macreadie, P.I.ORCID iD for Macreadie, P.I. orcid.org/0000-0001-7362-0882
Journal name Journal of fish biology
Volume number 78
Issue number 5
Start page 1561
End page 1573
Total pages 13
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011-05
ISSN 1095-8649
Summary This study investigated the feeding ecology of King George whiting Sillaginodes punctatus recruits to determine how diet composition varies between habitat types (seagrass and unvegetated habitats), and between sites separated by distance. Broad-scale sampling of seagrass and unvegetated habitats at nine sites in Port Phillip Bay (Australia) indicated the diet composition varied more by distance into the bay than by habitat. Near the entrance to the bay the diet was dominated by harpacticoids and gammarid amphipods, in the middle reaches of the bay the diet was completely dominated by harpacticoids, while at sites furthest into the bay, mysids and crab zoea were also important. Abundances of prey in guts was significantly higher between 1000 and 2200 hours compared with other times, indicating diurnal feeding. Laboratory determined gut evacuation rate (based on an exponential model) was estimated to be -0·54. Daily rations were highly variable among sites and habitat types. Sillaginodes punctatus recruits consumed much higher quantities of prey on unvegetated habitat than seagrass habitat at some middle reach sites; with prey consumption of harpacticoid copepods on unvegetated habitat approaching 3000 individuals per day at one site. The results of this study provide insight into why habitat associations of S. punctatus recruits within mosaics of seagrass and unvegetated habitat show high spatial variation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1095-8649.2011.02962.x
Field of Research 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
060701 Phycology (incl Marine Grasses)
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076246

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