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Working with CALD groups: testing the feasibility of an intervention to improve medication self-management in people with kidney disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease

Williams, Allison, Manias, Elizabeth, Liew, Danny, Gock, Hilton and Gorelik, Alexandra 2012, Working with CALD groups: testing the feasibility of an intervention to improve medication self-management in people with kidney disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, Renal Society of Australasia journal, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 62-69.

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Title Working with CALD groups: testing the feasibility of an intervention to improve medication self-management in people with kidney disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease
Author(s) Williams, Allison
Manias, ElizabethORCID iD for Manias, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-3747-0087
Liew, Danny
Gock, Hilton
Gorelik, Alexandra
Journal name Renal Society of Australasia journal
Volume number 8
Issue number 2
Start page 62
End page 69
Total pages 8
Publisher Renal Society of Australasia
Place of publication Beaumaris, Vic.
Publication date 2012-07
ISSN 1832-3804
Keyword(s) culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups
chronic kidney disease
diabetes
cardiovascular disease
medication
self-management
Summary Introduction: Australia is an ageing multicultural society with an increased prevalence of chronic conditions. The rise of coexisting diabetes, kidney disease and hypertension is placing a significant and increasing demand on Australian health services. Prescribed medications are a key component of reducing the disease burden of these coexisting conditions, and successful treatment is largely dependent on self-management of medications. Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups have an increased risk of medication mismanagement and are often excluded from intervention studies. We examined an intervention in this group and report on some of the difficulties and resource issues involved with studying CALD groups.

Methods: Patients aged ≥18 years of age with chronic kidney disease, diabetes and cardiovascular disease whose preference it was to speak Greek, Italian or Vietnamese were recruited from nephrology outpatients' clinics of two Australian metropolitan hospitals in 2009. A translated, multifactorial intervention, consisting of a medication review, a short PowerPoint presentation and motivational interviewing designed to improve medication self-efficacy and adherence, was tested in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) with 12 months follow-up post-baseline. People collecting data and assessing outcomes were blinded to group assignment.

Results: Seventy-eight participants were recruited and 29 participants completed the study. There were no significant differences in medication self-efficacy or adherence between the intervention and control groups at three, six and 12 months post-baseline.


Conclusion:
The pilot study was not feasible due to high attrition rates. This work has highlighted difficulties with conducting research into CALD groups using interpreting services and health literacy issues affecting medicine self-management in this group.
Language eng
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
1103 Clinical Sciences
1110 Nursing
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Renal Society of Australasia
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076303

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.