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Migration, acculturation and environment: determinants of obesity among Iranian migrants in Australia

Delavari, Maryam, Sønderlund, Anders Larrabee, Mellor, David, Mohebbi, Mohammadreza and Swinburn, Boyd 2015, Migration, acculturation and environment: determinants of obesity among Iranian migrants in Australia, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 1083-1098, doi: 10.3390/ijerph120201083.

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Title Migration, acculturation and environment: determinants of obesity among Iranian migrants in Australia
Author(s) Delavari, Maryam
Sønderlund, Anders Larrabee
Mellor, DavidORCID iD for Mellor, David orcid.org/0000-0001-5007-5906
Mohebbi, MohammadrezaORCID iD for Mohebbi, Mohammadreza orcid.org/0000-0001-9713-7211
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 12
Issue number 2
Start page 1083
End page 1098
Total pages 16
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-02
ISSN 1660-4601
Keyword(s) Acculturation
Health
Immigration
Iranians
Obesity
Physical environment
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
RISK-FACTORS
WOMEN
IMMIGRANTS
BEHAVIORS
AMERICANS
CHILDREN
Summary While migration from low- to high-income countries is typically associated with weight gain, the obesity risks of migration from middle-income countries are less certain. In addition to changes in behaviours and cultural orientation upon migration, analyses of changes in environments are needed to explain post-migration risks for obesity. The present study examines the interaction between obesity-related environmental factors and the pattern of migrant acculturation in a sample of 152 Iranian immigrants in Victoria, Australia. Weight measurements, demographics, physical activity levels and diet habits were also surveyed. The pattern of acculturation (relative integration, assimilation, separation or marginalization) was not related to body mass index, diet, or physical activity behaviours. Three relevant aspects of participants' perception of the Australian environment (physically active environments, social pressure to be fit, unhealthy food environments) varied considerably by demographic characteristics, but only one (physically active environments) was related to a pattern of acculturation (assimilation). Overall, this research highlighted a number of key relationships between acculturation and obesity-related environments and behaviours for our study sample. Theoretical models on migration, culture and obesity need to include environmental factors.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph120201083
Field of Research 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, MDPI AG
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076528

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.