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Alcohol advertising in sport and non-sport TV in Australia, during children's viewing times

O'Brien, Kerry S., Carr, Sherilene, Ferris, Jason, Room, Robin, Miller, Peter, Livingston, Michael, Kypri, Kypros and Lynott, Dermot 2015, Alcohol advertising in sport and non-sport TV in Australia, during children's viewing times, PLoS one, vol. 10, no. 8, Article number : e0134889, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0134889.

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Title Alcohol advertising in sport and non-sport TV in Australia, during children's viewing times
Author(s) O'Brien, Kerry S.
Carr, Sherilene
Ferris, Jason
Room, Robin
Miller, PeterORCID iD for Miller, Peter orcid.org/0000-0002-6896-5437
Livingston, Michael
Kypri, Kypros
Lynott, Dermot
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 10
Issue number 8
Season Article number : e0134889
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) adolescent
adult
advertising as topic
alcoholic beverages
Australia
child
preschool
humans
newborn
television
young adult
Summary Estimate the amount of alcohol advertising in sport vs. non-sport programming in Australian free-to-air TV and identify children's viewing audience composition at different times of the day. Alcohol advertising and TV viewing audience data were purchased for free-to-air sport and non-sport TV in Australia for 2012. We counted alcohol advertisements in sport and non-sport TV in daytime (6 am-8.29 pm) and evening periods (8.30 pm-11.59 pm) and estimated viewing audiences for children and young adults (0-4 years, 5-13 years, 14-17 years, 18-29 years). During the daytime, most of the alcohol advertising (87%) was on sport TV. In the evening, most alcohol advertising (86%) was in non-sport TV. There was little difference in the mean number of children (0-17 years) viewing TV in the evening (N = 273,989), compared with the daytime (N = 235,233). In programs containing alcohol advertising, sport TV had a greater mean number of alcohol adverts per hour (mean 1.74, SD = 1.1) than non-sport TV (mean 1.35, SD = .94). Alcohol advertising during the daytime, when large numbers of children are watching TV, is predominantly in free-to-air sport TV. By permitting day-time advertising in sport programs and in any programs from 8.30 pm when many children are still watching TV, current regulations are not protecting children from exposure to alcohol advertising.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0134889
Field of Research 170114 Sport and Exercise Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076548

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.