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Responses and relationship dynamics of men and their spouses during active surveillance for prostate cancer: health literacy as an inquiry framework

Kayser, Lars, Hansen-Nord, Nete S., Osborne, Richard H., Tjønneland, Anne and Hansen, Rikke D. 2015, Responses and relationship dynamics of men and their spouses during active surveillance for prostate cancer: health literacy as an inquiry framework, BMC public health, vol. 15, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12889-015-2068-8.

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Title Responses and relationship dynamics of men and their spouses during active surveillance for prostate cancer: health literacy as an inquiry framework
Author(s) Kayser, Lars
Hansen-Nord, Nete S.
Osborne, Richard H.ORCID iD for Osborne, Richard H. orcid.org/0000-0002-9081-2699
Tjønneland, Anne
Hansen, Rikke D.
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 15
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1471-2458
Summary BACKGROUND: Early stage prostate cancer patients may be allocated to active surveillance, where the condition is observed over time with no intervention. Living with a cancer diagnosis may impose stress on both the men and their spouses. In this study we explore whether the scores of and verbal responses to a Health Literacy Questionnaire can be used to identify individuals in need of information and support and to reveal differences in perception and understanding in health related situations within couples. METHODS: We used the nine-domain Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) as a framework to explore health literacy in eight couples where the men were on active surveillance for prostate cancer progression. Scores were calculated for each domain for both individuals. For each couple differences in scores were also calculated and related to the informants' self-reported experiences and reflections in relation to participating in an active surveillance program. Also an inductive analysis was performed to identify themes in the responses and these themes were compared to those of HLQ. RESULTS: The men tended to score higher than their spouses. There was no consistent relation between scores and the reported experiences and reflections. However, some interesting patterns emerged, e.g. in two of the three couples with the largest within couple differences in HLQ scores, responses revealed discrepancies in how the men and their spouses perceived their situation. Also, three themes emerged which related to six of the HLQ domains, i.e. involvement of spouses and other people around the men; support from and interaction with healthcare professionals; and use of the Internet for information retrieval. CONCLUSIONS: Using the HLQ as an interview framework provided insight into the differences within couples and provided new perspectives on their experiences, including their contact with health professionals and the patient-spouse interaction when dealing with prostate cancer. The HLQ used as a dialogue tool may be an adjunct to assist healthcare providers to understand the need for support and information of men with prostate cancer on active surveillance and the dynamics within couples.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2068-8
Field of Research 111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076756

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.