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The relationship between collectivism and climate: a review of the literature

Presbitero, Alfred and Langford, Peter H. 2013, The relationship between collectivism and climate: a review of the literature, in Proceedings of the International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology Congress; IACCAP 2010, International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology, Melboune, Vic., pp. 140-147.

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Title The relationship between collectivism and climate: a review of the literature
Author(s) Presbitero, Alfred
Langford, Peter H.
Conference name International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology Congress (2010: Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 7-10 Jul. 2010
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology Congress; IACCAP 2010
Editor(s) Kashima, Yoshihisa
Kashima, Emiko
Beatson, Ruth
Publication date 2013
Series Selected Papers from the Congress of the International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Conference series Steering the cultural dynamics
Start page 140
End page 147
Total pages 7
Publisher International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology
Place of publication Melboune, Vic.
Summary Collectivism is one of the well-researched dimensions of culture that pertains to an individual’s relationship to an in-group. Organisational climate, on the other hand, is predominantly defined as the shared perceptions of employees about their working environment. In spite of the long tradition of both constructs in the literature, the conceptual relationship between collectivism and climate has oftentimes been neglected. This paper explores this relationship by presenting (1) the conceptual overlap between culture and climate; (2) the congruence between collectivism and climate in terms of levels of conceptualisation and analysis; (3) the apparent influence of collectivism on organisational processes and practices that have been the domain of climate studies; and (4) the apparent influence of collectivism on climate outcomes. This paper also offers some recommendations to guide future studies including suggestions to have more empirical investigation to strongly establish the relationship between collectivism and climate, to investigate facets of climate simultaneously, to extend the link between climate and other work outcomes, to engage in multi-level research, and to explore how collectivism influences climate formation and change.
ISBN 9780984562732
Language eng
Field of Research 150308 International Business
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2013, IACCAP
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076919

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Department of Management
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