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'Laser chemistry' synthesis, physicochemical properties, and chemical processing of nanostructured carbon foams

Seral-Ascaso, Andres, Garriga, Rosa, Sanjuán, Maria Luisa, Razal, Joselito M., Lahoz, Ruth, Laguna, Mariano, de la Fuente, German F. and Muñoz, Edgar 2013, 'Laser chemistry' synthesis, physicochemical properties, and chemical processing of nanostructured carbon foams, Nanoscale research letters, vol. 8, Article number: 233, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1186/1556-276X-8-233.

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Title 'Laser chemistry' synthesis, physicochemical properties, and chemical processing of nanostructured carbon foams
Author(s) Seral-Ascaso, Andres
Garriga, Rosa
Sanjuán, Maria Luisa
Razal, Joselito M.
Lahoz, Ruth
Laguna, Mariano
de la Fuente, German F.
Muñoz, Edgar
Journal name Nanoscale research letters
Volume number 8
Season Article number: 233
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher SpringerOpen
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1931-7573
Keyword(s) carbon nanostructures
laser ablation
metal-carbon hybrids
laser chemistry
metal nanoparticles
fiber spinning
Summary Laser ablation of selected coordination complexes can lead to the production of metal-carbon hybrid materials, whose composition and structure can be tailored by suitably choosing the chemical composition of the irradiated targets. This 'laser chemistry' approach, initially applied by our group to the synthesis of P-containing nanostructured carbon foams (NCFs) from triphenylphosphine-based Au and Cu compounds, is broadened in this study to the production of other metal-NCFs and P-free NCFs. Thus, our results show that P-free coordination compounds and commercial organic precursors can act as efficient carbon source for the growth of NCFs. Physicochemical characterization reveals that NCFs are low-density mesoporous materials with relatively low specific surface areas and thermally stable in air up to around 600°C. Moreover, NCFs disperse well in a variety of solvents and can be successfully chemically processed to enable their handling and provide NCF-containing biocomposite fibers by a wet-chemical spinning process. These promising results may open new and interesting avenues toward the use of NCFs for technological applications.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1556-276X-8-233
Field of Research 091202 Composite and Hybrid Materials
100708 Nanomaterials
0204 Condensed Matter Physics
0912 Materials Engineering
1007 Nanotechnology
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30076966

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.