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Dysglycaemia and other predictors for progression or regression from impaired fasting glucose to diabetes or normoglycaemia

de Abreu, L., Holloway, Kara L., Kotowicz, Mark A. and Pasco, Julie A. 2015, Dysglycaemia and other predictors for progression or regression from impaired fasting glucose to diabetes or normoglycaemia, Journal of diabetes research, vol. 2015, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1155/2015/373762.

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Title Dysglycaemia and other predictors for progression or regression from impaired fasting glucose to diabetes or normoglycaemia
Author(s) de Abreu, L.
Holloway, Kara L.
Kotowicz, Mark A.ORCID iD for Kotowicz, Mark A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8094-1411
Pasco, Julie A.ORCID iD for Pasco, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Journal name Journal of diabetes research
Volume number 2015
Article ID 373762
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 2314-6745
2314-6753
Summary Aims. Diabetes mellitus is a growing health problem worldwide. This study aimed to describe dysglycaemia and determine the impact of body composition and clinical and lifestyle factors on the risk of progression or regression from impaired fasting glucose (IFG) to diabetes or normoglycaemia in Australian women.

Methods. This study included 1167 women, aged 20-94 years, enrolled in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors for progression to diabetes or regression to normoglycaemia (from IFG), over 10 years of follow-up.

Results. At baseline the proportion of women with IFG was 33.8% and 6.5% had diabetes. Those with fasting dysglycaemia had higher obesity-related factors, lower serum HDL cholesterol, and lower physical activity. Over a decade, the incidence of progression from IFG to diabetes was 18.1 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI, 10.7-28.2). Fasting plasma glucose and serum triglycerides were important factors in both progression to diabetes and regression to normoglycaemia.

Conclusions. Our results show a transitional process; those with IFG had risk factors intermediate to normoglycaemics and those with diabetes. This investigation may help target interventions to those with IFG at high risk of progression to diabetes and thereby prevent cases of diabetes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1155/2015/373762
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077029

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.