Marxists in the age of Palmer: a genealogy of ‘anti-politics’

Robinson, Geoffrey 2015, Marxists in the age of Palmer: a genealogy of ‘anti-politics’, in Conference Abstracts of the 14th Biennial Labour History Conference: Fighting Against War: Peace Activism in the Twentieth Century, Australian Society for the Study of Labor History, Melbourne, Vic..

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Title Marxists in the age of Palmer: a genealogy of ‘anti-politics’
Author(s) Robinson, Geoffrey
Conference name Labour History. Conference (14th: 2015, Melbourne, Vic)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 11-13 Feb. 2015
Title of proceedings Conference Abstracts of the 14th Biennial Labour History Conference: Fighting Against War: Peace Activism in the Twentieth Century
Publication date 2015
Total pages 1
Publisher Australian Society for the Study of Labor History
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) Australian politics
Australian politics
Summary The decline of trust in Australian political institutions and the rise of anti-political sentiment, most dramatically represented by the phenomenon of Clive Palmer, has been largely perplexing to the Australian left whether in its labourist, green or revolutionary varieties. In recent years support for Labor and the Greens has fallen, union membership has continued to stagnate and the revolutionary left has failed to break out of its campus enclaves despite a global crisis of capitalism. This article provides a critical examination of a minority trend within the Australian left that seen the rise of ‘anti-politics’ as a positive development. Leading figures in this have been Tad Tietze, Elizabeth Humphrys, Marc Newmann and anonymous blogger The Piping Shriek. Their work has been critical of attempts to revive traditional institutions of the left and has argued that the organised left has become committed to a project of state management of individual behaviour. This line of argument represents a distinctive critique of politics that echoes themes espoused by John Anderson and Sydney libertarianism. This article applies Michel Foucault’s genealogical approach to explain the revival of libertarian themes on the left and their particular resonance within Sydney political culture.
Language eng
Field of Research 160601 Australian Government and Politics
160609 Political Theory and Political Philosophy
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2015, Australian Society for the Study of Labor History
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077051

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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