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Sprint interval and moderate-intensity continuous training have equal benefits on aerobic capacity, insulin sensitivity, muscle capillarisation and endothelial eNOS/NAD(P)Hoxidase protein ratio in obese men

Cocks, Matthew, Shaw, Christopher S., Shepherd, Sam O., Fisher, James P., Ranasinghe, Aaron, Barker, Thomas A. and Wagenmakers, Anton J. M. 2016, Sprint interval and moderate-intensity continuous training have equal benefits on aerobic capacity, insulin sensitivity, muscle capillarisation and endothelial eNOS/NAD(P)Hoxidase protein ratio in obese men, Journal of physiology, vol. 594, no. 8, pp. 2307-2321, doi: 10.1113/jphysiol.2014.285254.

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Title Sprint interval and moderate-intensity continuous training have equal benefits on aerobic capacity, insulin sensitivity, muscle capillarisation and endothelial eNOS/NAD(P)Hoxidase protein ratio in obese men
Author(s) Cocks, Matthew
Shaw, Christopher S.ORCID iD for Shaw, Christopher S. orcid.org/0000-0003-1499-0220
Shepherd, Sam O.
Fisher, James P.
Ranasinghe, Aaron
Barker, Thomas A.
Wagenmakers, Anton J. M.
Journal name Journal of physiology
Volume number 594
Issue number 8
Start page 2307
End page 2321
Total pages 15
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng
Publication date 2016-04-14
ISSN 0022-3751
1469-7793
Summary Key points: Skeletal muscle capillary density and vasoreactivity are reduced in obesity, due to reduced nitric oxide bioavailability. Sprint interval training (SIT) has been proposed as a time efficient alternative to moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT), but its effect on the skeletal muscle microvasculature has not been studied in obese individuals. We observed that SIT and MICT led to equal increases in capillarisation and endothelial eNOS content, while reducing endothelial NOX2 content in microvessels of young obese men. We conclude that SIT is equally effective at improving skeletal muscle capillarisation and endothelial enzyme balance, while being a time efficient alternative to traditional MICT. Sprint interval training (SIT) has been proposed as a time efficient alternative to moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT), leading to similar improvements in skeletal muscle capillary density and microvascular function in young healthy humans. In this study we made the first comparisons of the muscle microvascular response to SIT and MICT in an obese population. Sixteen young obese men (age 25 ± 1 years, BMI 34.8 ± 0.9 kg m-2) were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of MICT (40-60 min cycling at ∼65% V˙O2 peak , 5 times per week) or constant load SIT (4-7 constant workload intervals of 200% Wmax 3 times per week). Muscle biopsies were taken before and after training from the m. vastus lateralis to measure muscle microvascular endothelial eNOS content, eNOS serine1177 phosphorylation, NOX2 content and capillarisation using quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy. Maximal aerobic capacity (V˙O2 peak ), whole body insulin sensitivity and arterial stiffness were also assessed. SIT and MICT increased skeletal muscle microvascular eNOS content and eNOS ser1177 phosphorylation in terminal arterioles and capillaries (P < 0.05), but the latter effect was eliminated when normalised to eNOS content (P = 0.217). SIT and MICT also reduced microvascular endothelial NOX2 content (P < 0.05) and both increased capillary density and capillary-fibre perimeter exchange index (P < 0.05). In parallel, SIT and MICT increased V˙O2 peak (P < 0.05) and whole body insulin sensitivity (P < 0.05), and reduced central artery stiffness (P < 0.05). As no significant differences were observed between SIT and MICT it is concluded that SIT is a time efficient alternative to MICT to improve aerobic capacity, insulin sensitivity and muscle capillarisation and endothelial eNOS/NAD(P)Hoxidase protein ratio in young obese men.
Language eng
DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.2014.285254
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077192

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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