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What doesn’t kill you makes you fitter: A systematic review of high-intensity interval exercise for patients with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases

Levinger, Itamar, Shaw, Christopher S., Stepto, Nigel K., Cassar, Samantha, McAinch, Andrew J., Cheetham, Craig and Maiorana, Andrew J. 2015, What doesn’t kill you makes you fitter: A systematic review of high-intensity interval exercise for patients with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology, vol. 9, pp. 53-63, doi: 10.4137/CMC.S26230.

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Title What doesn’t kill you makes you fitter: A systematic review of high-intensity interval exercise for patients with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases
Author(s) Levinger, Itamar
Shaw, Christopher S.ORCID iD for Shaw, Christopher S. orcid.org/0000-0003-1499-0220
Stepto, Nigel K.
Cassar, Samantha
McAinch, Andrew J.
Cheetham, Craig
Maiorana, Andrew J.
Journal name Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology
Volume number 9
Start page 53
End page 63
Total pages 11
Publisher Libertas Academica
Place of publication Auckland, New Zealand
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1179-5468
Keyword(s) Acute risk
Cardiovascular disease
Exercise prescription
Metabolic disease
Summary High-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) has gained popularity in recent years for patients with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Despite potential benefits, concerns remain about the safety of the acute response (during and/or within 24 hours postexercise) to a single session of HIIE for these cohorts. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate the safety of acute HIIE for people with cardiometabolic diseases. Electronic databases were searched for studies published prior to January 2015, which reported the acute responses of patients with cardiometabolic diseases to HIIE (≥80% peak power output or ≥85% peak aerobic power, VO2peak). Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria (n = 156; clinically stable, aged 27-66 years), with 13 adverse responses reported (∼8% of individuals). The rate of adverse responses is somewhat higher compared to the previously reported risk during moderate-intensity exercise. Caution must be taken when prescribing HIIE to patients with cardiometabolic disease. Patients who wish to perform HIIE should be clinically stable, have had recent exposure to at least regular moderate-intensity exercise, and have appropriate supervision and monitoring during and after the exercise session.
Language eng
DOI 10.4137/CMC.S26230
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Libertas Academica
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077193

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.