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Medical textiles as vascular implants and their success to mimic natural arteries

Singh, Charanpreet, Wong, Cynthia S. and Wang, Xungai 2015, Medical textiles as vascular implants and their success to mimic natural arteries, Journal of functional biomaterials, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 500-525, doi: 10.3390/jfb6030500.

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Title Medical textiles as vascular implants and their success to mimic natural arteries
Author(s) Singh, Charanpreet
Wong, Cynthia S.
Wang, Xungai
Journal name Journal of functional biomaterials
Volume number 6
Issue number 3
Start page 500
End page 525
Total pages 26
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-06-30
ISSN 2079-4983
Keyword(s) anisotropy
artery
braiding
compliance
electrospinning
graft
knitting
non-linearity
vascular stent
weaving
Summary Vascular implants belong to a specialised class of medical textiles. The basic purpose of a vascular implant (graft and stent) is to act as an artificial conduit or substitute for a diseased artery. However, the long-term healing function depends on its ability to mimic the mechanical and biological behaviour of the artery. This requires a thorough understanding of the structure and function of an artery, which can then be translated into a synthetic structure based on the capabilities of the manufacturing method utilised. Common textile manufacturing techniques, such as weaving, knitting, braiding, and electrospinning, are frequently used to design vascular implants for research and commercial purposes for the past decades. However, the ability to match attributes of a vascular substitute to those of a native artery still remains a challenge. The synthetic implants have been found to cause disturbance in biological, biomechanical, and hemodynamic parameters at the implant site, which has been widely attributed to their structural design. In this work, we reviewed the design aspect of textile vascular implants and compared them to the structure of a natural artery as a basis for assessing the level of success as an implant. The outcome of this work is expected to encourage future design strategies for developing improved long lasting vascular implants.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/jfb6030500
Field of Research 090301 Biomaterials
090302 Biomechanical Engineering
100499 Medical Biotechnology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077218

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.