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Do pain-related beliefs influence adherence to multidisciplinary rehabilitation? A systematic review

Thompson, Emma L., Broadbent, Jaclyn, Bertino, Melanie D. and Staiger, Petra K. 2016, Do pain-related beliefs influence adherence to multidisciplinary rehabilitation? A systematic review, Clinical journal of pain, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 164-178, doi: 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000235.

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Title Do pain-related beliefs influence adherence to multidisciplinary rehabilitation? A systematic review
Alternative title Do pain-related beliefs influence treatment adherence? A systematic review
Author(s) Thompson, Emma L.
Broadbent, JaclynORCID iD for Broadbent, Jaclyn orcid.org/0000-0003-4045-2039
Bertino, Melanie D.
Staiger, Petra K.
Journal name Clinical journal of pain
Volume number 32
Issue number 2
Start page 164
End page 178
Total pages 15
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2016-02
ISSN 0749-8047
1536-5409
Keyword(s) chronic pain
beliefs
treatment adherence
Summary OBJECTIVES: To understand how pain-related cognitions predict and influence treatment retention and adherence during and after a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program.

METHODS: Electronic databases including Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Academic Search Complete, and Scopus were used to search three combinations of keywords: chronic pain, beliefs, and treatment adherence.

RESULTS: The search strategy yielded 591 results, with an additional 12 studies identified through reference screening. 81 full-text papers were assessed for eligibility and 10 papers met the inclusion and exclusion criteria for this review. The pain-related beliefs that have been measured in relation to treatment adherence include: pain-specific self-efficacy, perceived disability, catastrophizing, control beliefs, fear-avoidance beliefs, perceived benefits and barriers, as well as other less commonly measured beliefs. The most common pain-related belief investigated in relation to treatment adherence was pain-related self-efficacy. Findings for the pain-related beliefs investigated among the studies were mixed. Collectively, all of the aforementioned pain-related beliefs, excluding control beliefs, were found to influence treatment adherence behaviours.

DISCUSSION: The findings suggest that treatment adherence is determined by a combination of pain-related beliefs either supporting or inhibiting chronic pain patients' ability to adhere to treatment recommendations over time. In the studies reviewed, self-efficacy appears to be the most commonly researched predictor of treatment adherence, its effects also influencing other pain-related beliefs. More refined and standardised methodologies, consistent descriptions of pain-related beliefs and methods of measurement will improve our understanding of adherence behaviours.
Language eng
DOI 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000235
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1103 Clinical Sciences
1109 Neurosciences
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Wolters Kluwer Health
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2017-03-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077271

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.