You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Investment in sensory structures, testis size, and wing coloration in males of a diurnal moth species: trade-offs or correlated growth?

Shiel, Brett P., Sherman, Craig D. H., Elgar, Mark A., Johnson, Tamara L. and Symonds, Matthew R. E. 2015, Investment in sensory structures, testis size, and wing coloration in males of a diurnal moth species: trade-offs or correlated growth?, Ecology and evolution, vol. 5, no. 8, pp. 1601-1608, doi: 10.1002/ece3.1459.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
symonds-investmentin-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 369.24KB 25

Title Investment in sensory structures, testis size, and wing coloration in males of a diurnal moth species: trade-offs or correlated growth?
Author(s) Shiel, Brett P.
Sherman, Craig D. H.ORCID iD for Sherman, Craig D. H. orcid.org/0000-0003-2099-0462
Elgar, Mark A.
Johnson, Tamara L.
Symonds, Matthew R. E.ORCID iD for Symonds, Matthew R. E. orcid.org/0000-0002-9785-6045
Journal name Ecology and evolution
Volume number 5
Issue number 8
Start page 1601
End page 1608
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley Open Access
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-04
ISSN 2045-7758
Keyword(s) Allometry
Lepidoptera
antenna size
coloration
receiver
sexual selection
signaling
testis size
Summary For dioecious animals, reproductive success typically involves an exchange between the sexes of signals that provide information about mate location and quality. Typically, the elaborate, secondary sexual ornaments of males signal their quality, while females may signal their location and receptivity. In theory, the receptor structures that receive the latter signals may also become elaborate or enlarged in a way that ultimately functions to enhance mating success through improved mate location. The large, elaborate antennae of many male moths are one such sensory structure, and eye size may also be important in diurnal moths. Investment in these traits may be costly, resulting in trade-offs among different traits associated with mate location. For polyandrous species, such trade-offs may also include traits associated with paternity success, such as larger testes. Conversely, we would not expect this to be the case for monandrous species, where sperm competition is unlikely. We investigated these ideas by evaluating the relationship between investment in sensory structures (antennae, eye), testis, and a putative warning signal (orange hindwing patch) in field-caught males of the monandrous diurnal painted apple moth Teia anartoides (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) in southeastern Australia. As predicted for a monandrous species, we found no evidence that male moths with larger sensory structures had reduced investment in testis size. However, contrary to expectation, investment in sensory structures was correlated: males with relatively larger antennae also had relatively larger eyes. Intriguingly, also, the size of male orange hindwing patches was positively correlated with testis size.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/ece3.1459
Field of Research 060808 Invertebrate Biology
060201 Behavioural Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley Open Access
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077339

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 95 Abstract Views, 25 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 28 Aug 2015, 13:54:28 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.