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Animal behaviour and cancer

Vittecoq, M., Ducasse, H., Arnal, A., Møller, A.P., Ujvari, B., Jacqueline, C.B., Tissot, T., Missé, D., Bernex, F., Pirot, N., Lemberger, K., Abadie, J., Labrut, S., Bonhomme, F., Renaud, F., Roche, B. and Thomas, F. 2015, Animal behaviour and cancer, Animal behaviour, vol. 101, pp. 19-26, doi: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2014.12.001.

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Title Animal behaviour and cancer
Author(s) Vittecoq, M.
Ducasse, H.
Arnal, A.
Møller, A.P.
Ujvari, B.ORCID iD for Ujvari, B. orcid.org/0000-0003-2391-2988
Jacqueline, C.B.
Tissot, T.
Missé, D.
Bernex, F.
Pirot, N.
Lemberger, K.
Abadie, J.
Labrut, S.
Bonhomme, F.
Renaud, F.
Roche, B.
Thomas, F.
Journal name Animal behaviour
Volume number 101
Start page 19
End page 26
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-03
ISSN 0003-3472
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Behavioral Sciences
Zoology
habitat selection
interspecific interactions
oncogenic processes
prophylactic behaviours
self-medication
tumours
FACIAL TUMOR DISEASE
LUCKE RENAL ADENOCARCINOMA
BREAST-CANCER
EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVE
IONIZING-RADIATION
SEXUAL SELECTION
SOCIAL-BEHAVIOR
BROWN BULLHEADS
IMMUNE-SYSTEM
Summary Scientists are increasingly coming to realize that oncogenic phenomena are both frequent and detrimental for animals, and must therefore be taken into account when studying the biology of wildlife species and ecosystem functioning. Here, we argue that several behaviours that are routine in an individual's life can be associated with cancer risks, or conversely prevent/cure malignancies and/or alleviate their detrimental consequences for fitness. Although such behaviours are theoretically expected to be targets for natural selection, little attention has been devoted to explore how they influence animal behaviour. This essay provides a summary of these issues as well as an overview of the possibilities offered by this research topic, including possible applications for cancer prevention and treatments in humans.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.anbehav.2014.12.001
Field of Research 060801 Animal Behaviour
06 Biological Sciences
07 Agricultural And Veterinary Sciences
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077457

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