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The influence of sighing respirations on infant lung function measured using multiple breath washout gas mixing techniques

Vukcevic, Damjan, Carlin, John B., King, Louise, Hall, Graham L., Ponsonby, Anne-Louise, Sly, Peter D., Vuillermin, Peter and Ranganathan, Sarath 2015, The influence of sighing respirations on infant lung function measured using multiple breath washout gas mixing techniques, Physiological reports, vol. 3, no. 4, e12347, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.14814/phy2.12347.

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Title The influence of sighing respirations on infant lung function measured using multiple breath washout gas mixing techniques
Author(s) Vukcevic, Damjan
Carlin, John B.
King, Louise
Hall, Graham L.
Ponsonby, Anne-Louise
Sly, Peter D.
Vuillermin, Peter
Ranganathan, Sarath
Journal name Physiological reports
Volume number 3
Issue number 4
Season e12347
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley Open Access
Place of publication Malden, Mass.
Publication date 2015-04
ISSN 2051-817X
Keyword(s) Infants
lung function
multiple breath washout
sighing respirations
Barwon Infant Study Investigator Group
Summary There is substantial interest in studying lung function in infants, to better understand the early life origins of chronic lung diseases such as asthma. Multiple breath washout (MBW) is a technique for measuring lung function that has been adapted for use in infants. Respiratory sighs occur frequently in young infants during natural sleep, and in accordance with current MBW guidelines, result in exclusion of data from a substantial proportion of testing cycles. We assessed how sighs during MBW influenced the measurements obtained using data from 767 tests conducted on 246 infants (50% male; mean age 43 days) as part of a large cohort study. Sighs occurred in 119 (15%) tests. Sighs during the main part of the wash-in phase (before the last 5 breaths) were not associated with differences in standard MBW measurements compared with tests without sighs. In contrast, sighs that occurred during the washout were associated with a small but discernible increase in magnitude and variability. For example, the mean lung clearance index increased by 0.36 (95% CI: 0.11-0.62) and variance increased by a multiplicative factor of 2 (95% CI: 1.6-2.5). The results suggest it is reasonable to include MBW data from testing cycles where a sigh occurs during the wash-in phase, but not during washout, of MBW. By recovering data that would otherwise have been excluded, we estimate a boost of about 10% to the final number of acceptable tests and 6% to the number of individuals successfully tested.
Language eng
DOI 10.14814/phy2.12347
Field of Research 110305 Emergency Medicine
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley Open Access
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077480

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.