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The ontogeny of naïve and regulatory CD4(+) T-cell subsets during the first postnatal year: a cohort study

Collier, Fiona M., Tang, Mimi L. K., Martino, David, Saffery, Richard, Carlin, John, Jachno, Kim, Ranganathan, Sarath, Burgner, David, Allen, Katrina J., Vuillermin, Peter and Ponsonby, Anne-Louise 2015, The ontogeny of naïve and regulatory CD4(+) T-cell subsets during the first postnatal year: a cohort study, Clinical and translational immunology, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1038/cti.2015.2.

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Title The ontogeny of naïve and regulatory CD4(+) T-cell subsets during the first postnatal year: a cohort study
Author(s) Collier, Fiona M.
Tang, Mimi L. K.
Martino, David
Saffery, Richard
Carlin, John
Jachno, Kim
Ranganathan, Sarath
Burgner, David
Allen, Katrina J.
Vuillermin, Peter
Ponsonby, Anne-Louise
Journal name Clinical and translational immunology
Volume number 4
Issue number 3
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-03
ISSN 2050-0068
Summary As there is limited knowledge regarding the longitudinal development and early ontogeny of naïve and regulatory CD4(+) T-cell subsets during the first postnatal year, we sought to evaluate the changes in proportion of naïve (thymic and central) and regulatory (resting and activated) CD4(+) T-cell populations during the first postnatal year. Blood samples were collected and analyzed at birth, 6 and 12 months of age from a population-derived sample of 130 infants. The proportion of naïve and regulatory CD4(+) T-cell populations was determined by flow cytometry, and the thymic and central naïve populations were sorted and their phenotype confirmed by relative expression of T cell-receptor excision circle DNA (TREC). At birth, the majority (94%) of CD4(+) T cells were naïve (CD45RA(+)), and of these, ~80% had a thymic naïve phenotype (CD31(+) and high TREC), with the remainder already central naïve cells (CD31(-) and low TREC). During the first year of life, the naïve CD4(+) T cells retained an overall thymic phenotype but decreased steadily. From birth to 6 months of age, the proportion of both resting naïve T regulatory cells (rTreg; CD4(+)CD45RA(+)FoxP3(+)) and activated Treg (aTreg, CD4(+)CD45RA(-)FoxP3(high)) increased markedly. The ratio of thymic to central naïve CD4(+) T cells was lower in males throughout the first postnatal year indicating early sexual dimorphism in immune development. This longitudinal study defines proportions of CD4(+) T-cell populations during the first year of postnatal life that provide a better understanding of normal immune development.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/cti.2015.2
Field of Research 110799 Immunology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077481

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.