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Is the adiposity rebound a rebound in adiposity?

Campbell, Michele Wen-Chien, Williams, Joanne, Carlin, John B. and Wake, Melissa 2011, Is the adiposity rebound a rebound in adiposity?, International journal of pediatric obesity, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 207-215, doi: 10.3109/17477166.2010.526613.

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Title Is the adiposity rebound a rebound in adiposity?
Author(s) Campbell, Michele Wen-Chien
Williams, JoanneORCID iD for Williams, Joanne orcid.org/0000-0002-5633-1592
Carlin, John B.
Wake, Melissa
Journal name International journal of pediatric obesity
Volume number 6
Issue number 3
Start page 207
End page 215
Total pages 9
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011-06
ISSN 1747-7174
Summary OBJECTIVE: Early adiposity rebound ([AR], when body mass index [BMI] rises after reaching a nadir) strongly predicts later obesity. We investigated whether the upswing in BMI at AR is accompanied by an increase in body fat. DESIGN: Community-based cohort study. SUBJECTS: A total of 299 first-born children (49% male). Measurements. Six-monthly anthropometry and bioelectrical impedance, 4-6.5 years; lean and fat mass index (kg/m(2)) for direct comparison with BMI. Supplementary (0-2 years) weight and length measures (needed for growth curve modelling) were drawn from subjects' child health records. METHODS: AR was estimated from individually modelled BMI curves from birth to 6.5 years. Two main analyses were performed: 1) cross-sectional comparisons of BMI, fat mass index (FMI), lean mass index (LMI) and percent body fat in children with early (<5 years) and later (>5 years) rebound; and 2) investigation of linear trends in BMI, FMI, LMI and percent body fat before and after AR. Results. The 81 children (27%) experiencing early AR had higher BMI, FMI, LMI and percent fat at 6.5 years. Overall, FMI decreased steeply pre-AR, at -0.56 (0.02) kg/m(2) per year (mean [Standard Error]), then flattened post-AR to 0.07 (0.05) kg/m(2) per year. In contrast, LMI increased pre-AR (0.34 [0.01]) and steepened post-AR (0.47 [0.03] kg/m(2) per year). CONCLUSION: The 'adiposity rebound' is characterised by increasing lean mass index, coupled with cessation of the decline in fat mass index. Understanding what controls the dynamics of childhood body composition and mechanisms that delay AR could help prevent obesity.
Language eng
DOI 10.3109/17477166.2010.526613
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Informa Healthcare
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077670

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.