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The early language in Victoria study: predicting vocabulary at age one and two years from gesture and object use

Bavin, E. L., Prior, M., Reilly, S., Bretherton, L., Williams, J., Eadie, P., Barrett, Y. and Ukoumunne, O. C. 2008, The early language in Victoria study: predicting vocabulary at age one and two years from gesture and object use, Journal of child language, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 687-701, doi: 10.1017/S0305000908008726.

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Title The early language in Victoria study: predicting vocabulary at age one and two years from gesture and object use
Author(s) Bavin, E. L.
Prior, M.
Reilly, S.
Bretherton, L.
Williams, J.ORCID iD for Williams, J. orcid.org/0000-0002-5633-1592
Eadie, P.
Barrett, Y.
Ukoumunne, O. C.
Journal name Journal of child language
Volume number 35
Issue number 3
Start page 687
End page 701
Total pages 16
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2008-08
ISSN 0305-0009
Keyword(s) Child Language
Gestures
Humans
Infant
Prospective Studies
Speech Production Measurement
Verbal Learning
Vocabulary
Summary The Macarthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (CDI) have been used widely to document early communicative development. The paper reports on a large community sample of 1,447 children recruited from low, middle and high socioeconomic (SES) areas across metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Regression analyses were conducted to determine the extent to which communicative behaviours reported at 0 ; 8 and 1 ; 0 predicted vocabulary development at 1 ; 0 and 2 ; 0. In support of previous findings with smaller, often less representative samples, gesture and object use at 1 ; 0 were better predictors of 2 ; 0 vocabulary than were gesture and object use at 0 ; 8. At 1 ; 0, children from the lower SES groups were reported to understand more words than children from the higher SES groups, but there were no SES differences for words produced at 1 ; 0 or 2 ; 0. The findings add to our understanding of the variability in the development of early communicative behaviours.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0305000908008726
Field of Research 111704 Community Child Health
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Cambridge University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077671

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.