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Trajectories and stability of self-reported short sleep duration from adolescence to adulthood

Hayley, Amie C., Skogen, Jens C., Øverland, Simon, Wold, Bente, Williams, Lana J., Kennedy, Gerard A. and Sivertsen, Borge 2015, Trajectories and stability of self-reported short sleep duration from adolescence to adulthood, Journal of sleep research, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 621-628, doi: 10.1111/jsr.12316.

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Title Trajectories and stability of self-reported short sleep duration from adolescence to adulthood
Author(s) Hayley, Amie C.
Skogen, Jens C.
Øverland, Simon
Wold, Bente
Williams, Lana J.ORCID iD for Williams, Lana J. orcid.org/0000-0002-1377-1272
Kennedy, Gerard A.
Sivertsen, Borge
Journal name Journal of sleep research
Volume number 24
Issue number 6
Start page 621
End page 628
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-12
ISSN 0962-1105
1365-2869
Keyword(s) adolescent
adult
epidemiological
longitudinal
sleep period
Summary The trajectories and stability of self-reported sleep duration recorded at ages 13, 15, and 23 years on reported sleep duration at age 30 years among 1105 students (55% male) who participated in the Norwegian Longitudinal Health and Behaviour Study were examined. Questionnaire data were used to obtain demographic and sleep variables. Dichotomised short sleep duration was based on normative values and set as ≤8.5 h (age 13 years), ≤8 h (age 15 years) and ≤7 h (ages 23 and 30 years). Results indicated a significant overall reduction in total sleep duration (h per night) across age groups. Sleep duration (continuous) at age 15 and 23 years (whole group) was moderately but positively correlated with sleep duration at age 30 years (P < 0.01). When split by sex, at age 15 years, this association was present among females only (P < 0.01); however, at age 23 years, this association was present in both male and females (both P < 0.001). Categorical short sleep at age 23 years (whole group) was associated with short sleep at age 30 years (unadjusted odds ratio = 3.67, 95% confidence interval 2.36-5.69). Following sex stratification, this effect was significant for both males (unadjusted odds ratio = 3.77, 95% confidence interval: 2.22-6.42) and females (unadjusted odds ratio = 2.71, 95% confidence interval: 1.46-5.04). No associations were noted for categorical short sleep at ages 13 or 15 years, and subsequent short sleep at 30 years. Habitual short sleep duration during middle adulthood is not sustained from the time of early adolescence. Rather, these trends appear to be formed during early adulthood.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/jsr.12316
Field of Research 111710 Health Counselling
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077713

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.