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Does angling technique selectively target fishes based on their behavioural type?

Wilson, Alexander D. M., Brownscombe, Jacob W., Sullivan, Brittany, Jain-Schlaepfer, Sofia and Cooke, Steven J. 2015, Does angling technique selectively target fishes based on their behavioural type?, PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 8, Article Number : e0135848, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0135848.

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Title Does angling technique selectively target fishes based on their behavioural type?
Author(s) Wilson, Alexander D. M.
Brownscombe, Jacob W.
Sullivan, Brittany
Jain-Schlaepfer, Sofia
Cooke, Steven J.
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 10
Issue number 8
Season Article Number : e0135848
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary Recently, there has been growing recognition that fish harvesting practices can have important impacts on the phenotypic distributions and diversity of natural populations through a phenomenon known as fisheries-induced evolution. Here we experimentally show that two common recreational angling techniques (active crank baits versus passive soft plastics) differentially target wild largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) based on variation in their behavioural tendencies. Fish were first angled in the wild using both techniques and then brought back to the laboratory and tested for individual-level differences in common estimates of personality (refuge emergence, flight-initiation-distance, latency-to-recapture and with a net, and general activity) in an in-lake experimental arena. We found that different angling techniques appear to selectively target these species based on their boldness (as characterized by refuge emergence, a standard measure of boldness in fishes) but not other assays of personality. We also observed that body size was independently a significant predictor of personality in both species, though this varied between traits and species. Our results suggest a context-dependency for vulnerability to capture relative to behaviour in these fish species. Ascertaining the selective pressures angling practices exert on natural populations is an important area of fisheries research with significant implications for ecology, evolution, and resource management.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0135848
Field of Research 070403 Fisheries Management
Socio Economic Objective 830201 Fisheries - Recreational
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077720

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.