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Individual differences in activity and habitat selection of juvenile queen conch evaluated using acceleration biologgers

Brownscombe, Jacob W., Wilson, Alexander D. M., Samson, Emma, Nowell, Liane, Cooke, Steven J. and Danylchuk, Andy J. 2015, Individual differences in activity and habitat selection of juvenile queen conch evaluated using acceleration biologgers, Endangered species research, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 181-188, doi: 10.3354/esr00664.

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Title Individual differences in activity and habitat selection of juvenile queen conch evaluated using acceleration biologgers
Author(s) Brownscombe, Jacob W.
Wilson, Alexander D. M.
Samson, Emma
Nowell, Liane
Cooke, Steven J.
Danylchuk, Andy J.
Journal name Endangered species research
Volume number 27
Issue number 2
Start page 181
End page 188
Total pages 8
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1863-5407
1613-4796
Keyword(s) queen conch
activity
movement
accelerometer
behaviour
habitat selection
Summary Fine-scale differences in behaviour and habitat use have important ecological implications, but have rarely been examined in marine gastropods. We used tri-axial accelerometer loggers to estimate activity levels and movement patterns of the juvenile queen conch Lobatus gigas (n = 11) in 2 habitat types in Eleuthera, The Bahamas. In 2 manipulations in nearshore areas, queen conchs were equipped with accelerometers and released in adjacent coral rubble or seagrass habitats. Queen conchs were located approximately every 6 h during daylight by snorkeling, to measure individual differences in linear distance moved, and after 24 h they were relocated to an alternate habitat (24 h in each habitat). We found significant inter-individual variability in activity levels, but more consistent levels of activity between the 2 habitat types within individual queen conchs. Four (36%) of the individuals placed in seagrass moved back to the adjacent coral rubble habitat, suggesting selectivity for coral rubble. Individuals showed variable behavioural responses when relocated to the less preferable seagrass habitat, which may be related to differing stress-coping styles. Our results suggest that behavioural variability between individuals may be an important factor driving movement and habitat use in queen conch and, potentially, their susceptibility to human stressors. This study provides evidence of diverse behavioural (activity) patterns and habitat selectivity in a marine gastropod and highlights the utility of accelero meter biologgers for continuously monitoring animal behaviour in the wild.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/esr00664
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077723

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.