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A systematic review of how researchers characterize the school environment in determining its effect on student obesity

Turner, Kyle, Foster, Charlie, Allender, Steven and Plugge, Emma 2015, A systematic review of how researchers characterize the school environment in determining its effect on student obesity, BMC obesity, vol. 2, no. 13, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1186/s40608-015-0045-5.

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Title A systematic review of how researchers characterize the school environment in determining its effect on student obesity
Author(s) Turner, Kyle
Foster, Charlie
Allender, Steven
Plugge, Emma
Journal name BMC obesity
Volume number 2
Issue number 13
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 2052-9538
Keyword(s) Childhood obesity
Environmental measurement
School
Summary BACKGROUND: Obesity in early childhood is a robust predictor of obesity later in life. Schools provide unparalleled access to children and have subsequently become major intervention sites. However, empirical evidence supporting the effectiveness of school-based interventions against childhood obesity is of limited scope and unknown quality. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess how researchers have characterized the school environment in determining its effect on childhood weight status in order to improve the quality and consistency of research in this area. We conducted a narrative review with a systematic search of the literature in line with PRISMA guidelines (2009). Original peer-reviewed research articles in English were searched from Medline, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases from earliest record to January 2014. We included empirical research that reported at least one measure of the primary/elementary school environment and its relationship with at least one objective adiposity-related variable for students aged 4-12 years. Two authors independently extracted data on study design, school-level factors, student weight status, type of analysis and effect. RESULTS: Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Each study targeted different parts of the school environment and findings across the studies were not comparable. The instruments used to collect school-level data report no validity or reliability testing. CONCLUSIONS: Our review shows that researchers have used instruments of unknown quality to test if the school environment is a determinant of childhood obesity, which raises broader questions about the impact that schools can play in obesity prevention.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s40608-015-0045-5
Field of Research 111704 Community Child Health
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077885

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.